Talk:Withdrawal methods

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I've also got some graphics showing yearly withdrawal amounts and remaining portfolio values for each method that I will upload as soon as possible. Unfortunately, at the moment, the image upload function is not working. I've PM'ed Alex and asked him to investigate the problem when he has a moment. --CyberBob 19:14, 27 August 2008 (UTC)

mptfan e-mailed with the following request" suggest adding a section addressing tax strategies related to withdrawals in retirement. E.g., withdrawing from tax deferred accounts to fill up the lower tax brackets. Blbarnitz 21:35, 27 August 2008 (UTC)

I didn't add the Portfolios sidebar here, it looked out of place. The navigation template is sufficient. --LadyGeek 13:11, 7 November 2010 (EST)

Reader feedback: Include a survey at the end ...

173.57.150.94 posted this comment on 16 December 2013 (view all feedback).

Include a survey at the end on the method retired members used closest to those listed and if they started using one method then switched.

Any thoughts?

Blbarnitz 14:34, 17 December 2013 (CST)

An anonymous survey is not a credible information source and is not appropriate to be included in the wiki. Additionally, withdrawal methods are dependent upon individual situations; a survey should not be used to provide this type of advice. It's better to have a forum discussion so that circumstances can be better understood. --LadyGeek 21:41, 17 December 2013 (CST)

Reader feedback: Add the various "bucket" met...

71.191.175.215 posted this comment on 20 January 2014 (view all feedback).

Add the various "bucket" methods now proposed.

Any thoughts?

Blbarnitz 10:40, 20 January 2014 (CST)

Reader feedback: Should expenses greater than...

12.230.214.18 posted this comment on 27 July 2014 (view all feedback).

Should expenses greater than social security and RMD be taken from taxable or from traditional IRA?

Any thoughts?

Blbarnitz 18:06, 27 July 2014 (CDT)

Constant-dollar is NOT a recommended withdrawal method

The 4% SWR (Constant-dollar) withdrawal method is just a planning tool, useful to answer the question "how much do I need to retire?". It is not meant as a withdrawal method.

Professor Philip L. Cooley, senior author of the paper referred to in our forum as "the Trinity study" (one of the sources for the "4% rule" or SWR) wrote "Stay flexible my friend!, which is the advice we should give to retirees" (see Bogleheads® forum post: What the Trinity Study authors meant).

Yet, our wiki page about portfolio withdrawal methods displays Constant-dollar prominently in first position, without providing any warning about the fact that it shouldn't be actually used during retirement.

Also, I think that our presentation of portfolio withdrawal methods should discuss more broadly how portfolio withdrawals should be combined with unsurvivable base income such as Social Security, a pension (if any), and (if necessary) a Single Premium Immediate Annuity, ideally indexed to inflation. Something along what we find in Variable percentage withdrawal#How to use variable-percentage withdrawals during retirement.

What do you think?

Longinvest 07:26, 13 April 2016 (UTC-0400)

How is Constant-dollar different than Constant-percentage and Variable-percentage? To me, each of these are methods - meaning how to withdraw. I agree that the content should have a broader discussion. If you have some ideas, create a user page for developing your ideas and we can work from that.
Have you looked at the possibility to connect this page to Retirement spending, which is another perspective?
--LadyGeek 17:13, 13 April 2016 (EDT)

Reader feedback: How the background graph (bl...

69.124.35.224 posted this comment on 10 September 2020 (view all feedback).

How the background graph (blue bars) on each of these examples was created is unclear. Is this supposed to be $50K growing over 35 years? That does not seem to add up. Could you add a key? Thank you - otherwise, totally amazing page!

Any thoughts?

Peculiar Investor 12:26, 18 October 2020 (UTC)