Gardening 2021

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peppers
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Gardening 2021

Post by peppers »

It's time

Started my pepper plants inside with 3 trays of Italian and Jalapeno pepper seeds. The plants are roughly 2" in height. Planning out where to put them when the weather breaks to the upside.

Gardeners, feel free to jump in.
"..the cavalry ain't comin' kid, you're on your own..."
Teague
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Teague »

I've got 6 tomato plants in the ground so far, using large amounts of straw as mulch this year. Planting some corn is next.
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Sheepdog
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Sheepdog »

I planted 250 + tulip bulbs last fall added to the many other earlier blooming spring bulbs already in the ground. The hyacinths were especially pretty this spring and were very sweet smelling. The early spring flowering bulbs are now past their peak, but the tulips are at their peak now, It was worth the work to see the beautiful color today after the drab winter.
The forsythias were beautiful this spring. However, the magnolia tree lost its almost ready to open blooms last week when the 20 degrees F temperature did them in. It is disappointing. And, that same cold dip will prevent my old wisteria from again blooming this year, but actually, we only get a nice blooming only about 2 times in 10 years. It appeared that this would be one of those good years, but alas.....
Soon, our pink dogwood will be special this year as well as the azaleas and other flowering shrubs. I expect that my spring and summer perennials will be in good shape.
I should be able to plant some annuals of various kinds in a few weeks as well as some tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, summer and fall squash.

But, then again, I am trying to kill off the violets and other not so nice growth in the lawn

Woof Woof.
Unless you try to do something beyond what you have already mastered you will never grow. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
Mr. Rumples
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Mr. Rumples »

I'm exhausted. I finished turning over my green manure crop by hand. Here in zone 7, its going crazy out, especially the viburnums, but don't get tempted too much yet...the ground is still cold. Harvested Cardoon seeds last year, am anxious to see if I can grow more from seed. Since Cotinus, the smoketree, blooms on new growth and its under power lines, I spent today turning it into a weeping specimen.

For some reason, the cold spell we had two weeks ago, killed one of my two black butterfly shrubs. Hopefully there is life in it somewhere that I can coax out.
Conch55
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Conch55 »

Zone 8a here. My vegetables are staged (in pots) with an anticipated 1 May date to get most into the ground or larger pots. Cucumber, squash and zucchini started from seeds. Six varieties of tomatoes, Thai and sweet basil, bell and jalapeno peppers were purchased at the big box garden center. Other herbs are from seed. Hoping for a longer growing season than last year.
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GKSD
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by GKSD »

Novice in gardening here but very skilled in killing plants by over watering.

Removed a tall 40' Italian cypress and planted an Algerian Mandarin. Could use tips on how to nurture citrus in Zone 10a.
DoubleComma
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by DoubleComma »

Zone 9 here. I have 8 4'x4' raised beds; but one is a dedicated strawberry bed so that rarely changes and I rotate another as unplanted each season, which is really to give my wife a bed to propagate her succulents

I've had Tomato & Pepper transplants in the ground for 4 weeks. Tomatoes are looking good at about 14", peppers are a hanging in but waiting for more consistent heat.

Herb garden got a refresh of basil and cilantro.

Just finished harvesting English peas and carrots so those beds are getting prepped for corn.

I have seed potatoes in the ground with foliage just stating to show. My green beans, sowed from seed directly in the beds, are all about 5" (4 leaves).

Looking forward to a productive summer garden.
MP173
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by MP173 »

Zone 5 - NW Indiana reporting...

DW has 18 tomato plants from seed still inside and all are about 10" tall, has transplanted twice. STill under grow lights. She purchased new grow lights this year with great results. She manages the seedlings...this is the best result ever.

Outside:
Garlic planted in October - about 8 inches tall. About 70 plants plus a couple that didnt get harvested with another 25 or so which will be small.
Spinach and lettuce planted in 2' x 1.5' containers and covered with window for a mini hot box. About 60 lettuce seedlings and 30 spinach growing.
Sugar snap peas planted around March 20th. I counted 50 plants today -about 1" tall.
Planted 20 leek transplants and 50 shallets transplanted today.
Planted 3 kale transplants yesterday.

Tomorrow...weather permitting:
Plant red onion plants and yellow onion plants.
Brussel sprouts and more kale.
Carrots and lettuce/spinach. Try to plant lettuce and spinach on every 10 days.

ed
mancich
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by mancich »

Zone 5 here in Upstate NY. Already added compost to our raised beds and can't wait to get the veggies planted..
mike66
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by mike66 »

Fingerlakes region of NY Zone 6A

Garlic about 10" tall planted last October
Planted broccoli and lettuce seedlings in the covered beds last week
All beds turned and compost added
Apples and peaches pruned
chw
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by chw »

Zone 6 here (eastern MA)- started harvesting butternut and red leaf lettuce from a cold frame I built this spring. It’s working nicely with a solar opener to vent excess heat. The lettuce seems to love it so far. Adding a new 8x4 raised bed to the 2 built last year.
sevenseas
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by sevenseas »

zone 5b, Catskills NY

-forsythia are in full bloom and daffodils are ramping up. Hellebores are blooming. Also planted 200 tulip bulbs last autumn and foliage is emerging; really looking forward to these! We need rain...hopefully later this weekend.
-winter sowed hardy annual flowers in February and tender annuals last week (gallon milk jugs)
-added 2 new raised beds (for a total of 6). Lumber this year is eye-wateringly expensive :shock:
-starting to plant shelling peas, lettuce, radishes, turnips. In another 2 weeks, chard, carrots, beets
-planning a small "woodland" grove in wooded area of backyard; put in tree order at local nursery. Mostly dogwoods, Korean and Japanese maples
-oh, almost forgot: just ordered 4 potted fig trees, various cultivars, online. I went down the rabbit hole of potted fig gardening websites and got sucked in. As if i don't already have enough gardening to do, I'll now be raising 6 potted figs and overwintering them in my garage. :)
hudson
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by hudson »

zone 7b....It's dry enough that I made 2 passes with my tiller.
I learned the hard way not to plant any tomatoes or cukes until May 1.
I've been gardening in this spot for decades.
When will frost go away for you?

https://davesgarden.com/guides/freeze-frost-dates/#b
Ryzen
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Ryzen »

Planning to pretty much double the size of the garden this year. We liked eating our home-grown romaine lettuce last year much more than I like cutting grass :) This will be the first year we will try to grow onions. Based on the insane amount of wild onions that I have to fight in our beds each year (every year it gets better, hoping that I can manually eradicate them without spraying - don't think the prior homeowners were very good about keeping the beds cleared out) I doubt we will have a problem growing them.
eob616
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by eob616 »

Hello! Zone 7a.

Tomato and eggplant seedlings are doing well inside under growlights. I've also tried starting a bunch of perennial flowers (and a few marigolds) indoors under a grow light as an experiment, but they're not doing as well--most have hit the cotyledon stage and sort of stalled for the last week or more. Anyone with experience or tips to share on this?

The major project over the last month was building and filling brand new raised beds over what was basically a swamp of clay soil. They're done, mostly planted (snow peas and spring-friendly greens) or cover cropped for the spring, and I'm cautiously optimistic for how they'll do this year. I can already tell that drainage is vastly improved.
SimonJester
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by SimonJester »

In 5B here, I have carrots and radish in the ground. Indoors I have peppers starting to sprout along with winter squash and cucumbers sprouted now about 2" high with their first set of leaves. We generally cant put anything in the ground until after mother's day here. Looking forward to tomatoes...

I expanded my 4x4 raised bed to a 4x8, lumber prices are high right now and availability is down... We just planted 100 bulbs in a area of the yard we re did. And of course its going to snow this week....
"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin
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Info_Hound
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Info_Hound »

Zone 5 here at 5,000ft altitude. Seems this year I have been bitten by the early gardner bug harder than normal.

My herb garden goes in first, but plants are staged inside due to a week of off and on snow and below freezing temps coming. Our 'safe' planting date is mid-May. Right now cold weather veggies can be planted, if you can time bed turning and planting between the storms.

The soil enrichers are staged next to the tiered beds, waiting to be turned and added. The siberian irises are poking up above the mulch, which is promising because I thinned the tubers last Fall. Have an order in that will ship the 1st week of May for some Tuff Stuff mountain hydrangeas to replace my PJMs which have not fared well in this zone.
flyingaway
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by flyingaway »

Three cold days in early April killed most of the flowers of my peach and pear trees. This is likely to be another year of no harvests for the frit trees. Last year, a late freeze in May killed almost all harvests.
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F150HD
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by F150HD »

Sheepdog wrote: Fri Apr 09, 2021 1:00 pm I planted 250 + tulip bulbs last fall added to the many other earlier blooming spring bulbs already in the ground. The hyacinths were especially pretty this spring and were very sweet smelling. The early spring flowering bulbs are now past their peak, but the tulips are at their peak now, It was worth the work to see the beautiful color today after the drab winter.
would love to see that.

thats a rabbits buffet in my neck of woods. You must not have that problem.

flyingaway wrote: Sat Apr 10, 2021 11:06 am Three cold days in early April killed most of the flowers of my peach and pear trees. This is likely to be another year of no harvests for the frit trees. Last year, a late freeze in May killed almost all harvests.
same freeze happened here last spring, no apples last summer for me.
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Sheepdog
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Sheepdog »

F150HD wrote: Sat Apr 10, 2021 12:03 pm

would love to see that.

thats a rabbits buffet in my neck of woods. You must not have that problem.

I have rabbits, squirrels, raccoons, 'possums. I don't know why they have never given me an appreciable gardening problem.
Unless you try to do something beyond what you have already mastered you will never grow. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
Mike Scott
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Mike Scott »

Midwest. My wife has been planting stuff in the garden. The fruit trees are in full bloom. I have 10 lbs of native grass seed mix to put into my prairie project this weekend. The yard needed mowing a week ago but it has been too wet to mow and is still raining. It looks like a great year for dandelions so far. Everything is turning green and/or flowering.
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praxis
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by praxis »

Here in our part of the South we are in zone 9a, which lists our average last frost in Feb. We got a cold snap very late and it hit the teens every night for a week. We thought we had lost most of our plants, but I believe the cold days rejuvenated even the citrus. There was die back everywhere but we chose to leave it and saw everything but our bottle brush coming back strong. Of course our roses loved the cold. Most of our perennials over-winter with all their foliage, but this spring, except for some evergreens like photinia, azalea, banana magnolia, pineapple guava and camellia the rest that weren't covered were burnt and brown. They all now have brilliant new leaves like our Dutch elms and water oaks. Few non-human joys as rich as our garden.
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F150HD
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by F150HD »

Sheepdog wrote: Sat Apr 10, 2021 4:40 pm I have rabbits, squirrels, raccoons, 'possums. I don't know why they have never given me an appreciable gardening problem.
they must have other (preferred) food sources nearby. Have had rabbits even start eating trees here in late winter - branches and the like.
Sagefemme
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Sagefemme »

Zone 7B. Arrrggh, have not done anything much yet besides note a big crop of weeds and mutter, "gotta get to that."

A friend gave me an agave in a pot, agave parryi var. truncata or somesuch. There were a few "pups" growing out of the holes in the bottom of the plastic pot. I detached them and replanted in cactus mix. Hoping they will take! I love agaves but they are not completely reliable in my zone. Unfortunately I have been known to forget to move them to a sheltered and dry location for the winter, then they succumb to cold and wet. Going to try to treat this new one better!!
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jabberwockOG
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by jabberwockOG »

Zone 8b 4x12 raised bed. We get our tomatoes in very early each year - they are mostly done by June. Squash is done by mid may. Then replaced with poblano, habanero, jalapeno, and various bell peppers.

Tomatoes are very strong this year. 4 tomatoes (celebrity, early girl) two feet high and setting fruit. 1 cherry tomato has 20-30 small green fruit on it already.
Mixed lettuce also strong this spring. We have been picking it for 3 weeks for lunch salad at least every other day, still have way more than we can use.
Kentucky pole bean seedlings now about 2 feet high and climbing up the trellis.
Japanese eggplant has multiple flowers about to set fruit - maybe 18-20 inches high.
Regular eggplant about 14 inches high, struggling a little, no flowers yet.
4 squash plants ready to flower. Likely will start to fruit in the next 10 days.
Red Zebra
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Red Zebra »

I am in zone 7 and gardening is one of the joys in my life. I love to get my hands in the dirt and help things grow. Several years ago, we moved to a larger property with over one acre of ground -- as opposed to the typical suburban postage stamp property. It was among the best things we ever did in life. I had been gardening for over 20 years at that time, but only had a tiny amount of area for vegetables. While I still don't have a huge veg garden, it does offer me the opportunity to experiment by trying to grow new things. I went from buying seedlings at the garden center, and thus, being captive to what its growers decided to grow that year, to starting all of my veg from seed. I just have a basement grow light, but will grow 20 different heirloom tomato varieties this year, five different sweet peppers, two different bush beans, and usually have one or two more unusual vegetables to go with the more traditional stuff.

I expanded into growing perennials from seed a couple of years ago as well. What a money saver! I order perennial seeds from places like Baker Creek and this gets me quality seed stock to grow out for a fraction of the cost of buying plants. Plus, these are activities that I thoroughly enjoy.
My seedlings won't go in the ground until the first week of May, perhaps around Mother's Day. The plants don't really get going until Memorial Day anyhow,
but most gardeners are ready to put the trowel in the dirt before then and I am no exception.
Lynette
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Lynette »

Zone 6A. Last year I got into a big project redoing both my front and back lawns so I neglected vegetables. This week we are going to plant Onions, Beans, Garlic, Carrots, Squash, Beets and Potatoes. The weis a group of volunteers at a local farm owned by a university. This is part of the Master Gardeners Program. In this way I learn a lot and feel goog as we donate the produce to a food bank.
stimulacra
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by stimulacra »

Zone 9 tropical here. Pretty much every plant in my patio garden died during the freeze.

Restarted my herb garden this month with the following below:

1) Sweet Basil
2) Spicy Basil
3) Dill
4) Mint
5) Spearmint
6) Sage
7) Lemon Verdanna
8) Jalapeno Peppers
9) Habenaro Peppers
10) Scallions

Will probably add aloe vera and some other "home remedy" type plants over the spring.

Also got a worm composting bin going on in an old whiskey barrel pot. Kitchen scraps, coffee grounds, and shredded cardboard goes in, after six months I'll have a decent amount of worm castings for the other plants.
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4nursebee
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Location: US

Re: Gardening 2021

Post by 4nursebee »

The irrigation system I've been waiting months on is being started today. 1.3 acres for Pawpaws!
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phinanciallyfit
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by phinanciallyfit »

Zone 7b

I've always loved gardening, but have only owned a house for about 3 years now, so I'm still experimenting. Previous owners left us with lovely and mature grape vines, which we will hopefully remember to cover with netting this year. The cherry trees are in bloom, which is later than last year which I am hoping means they wont be killed off by frost like last year.

We have shallots, pak choi, carrots, potatoes, sugar snap peas, lettuce, radishes, and lettuce in the ground and doing well. Potato plants are just starting to pop out of the ground and my shallot greens are about 8" high. I probably should have started a bit more lettuce earlier... maybe next year. I always seem to struggle with greens. I always try for spinach, but never succeed.

I have tomatoes, Asian eggplant, basil, broccoli and kale seedlings that enjoy sunlight outdoors in the day, but come in at night. I trade seedlings with my mom, and she started some peppers for me. I have a few more weeks before I can plant them outside because our night temps get cold.

I might start some zucchini and cucumber this week. I'll do some green beans too, but those start outside later in the season.

I need to improve my grow light set up (I only have 1 tiny light) for next year. Any one have recommendations on good grow lights?
Dougiefresh
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Dougiefresh »

Zone 10B

Heirloom tomatoes are planted. Gold Nugget is blossoming!
Escarole, swiss chard, radicchio and butter lettuce are thriving.
Gonna work on my herbs this season: Basil, parsley, and thyme. Sage and rosemary are doing fine.
kd2008
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by kd2008 »

Zone 7a. I was wanting to plant my annuals yesterday ..a lovely 75 F day. Decided not to because of the forecast ..now 38 F and snowing, 31 F tomorrow morning. I bought my annuals last week, but they are inside the house now. Glad I didn't plant them.

Hopefully, this was the last of it and I can plant this coming Saturday.
Conch55
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Conch55 »

With a potential for frost later this week my reluctance to put summer crops in the ground before May is vindicated. Years ago I would plant when items appeared in the garden centers but not any more. Heck, I might not even hit my 1 May target but that's okay, it will be hot all summer. :beer
Rudy Tooty
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Rudy Tooty »

Tomatoes, cucumbers and red/green peppers planted and caged. Planter's mix, peat moss and chicken manure - w/ tomato food - mixed in clay soil and topped with tree bark mulch. Tomatoes are supersteak, early girl and better boy. Japanese cucumbers. Cut down a large pepper tree in the back yard so the garden will get a full 8 hours of sun each day. With all the effort, time, money it takes to grow a successful veg garden sometimes I wonder whether it's worth the trouble. But the taste is 100% better than the junk sold in the grocery stores. Hoping for a healthy crop.
MP173
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by MP173 »

Zone 5 reporting in again...NW Indiana.

Snow today, but quickly melted. Temps down to freezing tonight.

So far:
60 Leeks
76 Shallots
79 Yellow Copra Onion
52 Red Zeppelin Onions
All of the above purchased as transplants from Dixondale FArms in Tx. I have also planted a few onion sets. I like the Dixondale onions as "storage" onions can be purchased which will last several months. No control over the onion "sets". Also like the leeks from Dixondale. First year for Shallots....DW is excited about cooking with them...I am excited about her cooking with the Shallots.

Spinach - eating spinach which was "overwinter"...it looks and tastes great. Also a few carrots "overwinter".
Planted spinach (Bloomingdale) and lettuce (Simpson Elite) and carrots in March and April.

Radish planted in March.

About 90 Sugar Snap Pea plants are up and growing.

First asparagus (only one) appeared April 13th.

Indoors....under the careful watch of DW:
18 Roma Tomato - about 10" tall...will plant in 3 weeks, subject to 10 day weather forecast.
4 bell peppers (from store purchased peppers...will be interesting to see what we get).
2 lunch pail peppers (from purchased seeds).
4 Chard
and a few others...the new grow light has been outstanding.

I am helping with church community garden...last weekend we completed building cedar raised beds (donation from a retiree). I have raised beds (no lumber) - 10 x 10 already in place - garlic, onions, kale, brussel sprouts. Created 2 raised beds with compost and legacy soil - will plant potato, sweet potato, pole bean (Forex), and possibly popcorn.

Also have another community garden plot with more onions and garlic...will plant carrots and possibly popcorn there.

Home garden is 28 x 16 with 8 raised beds which we will grow tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, carrots, more potatoes, and pole beans. This is in addition to the asparagus, garlic, radish, lettuce, onion, leeks, shallot, carrot, spinach, and lettuce. In addition we have herb garden here at home - DW is in charge of that. She uses herbs all summer then dries out and stores for winter use.

We eat quite well, not only during summer but during the winter with frozen and canned goods.

Ed
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6miths
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by 6miths »

Just nipping on 7a here and have a good micro-climate. Very dry and pretty warm spring so well ahead of schedule. Four yards of soil in gardens and lawn and got 2 more today. 2000 sq feet of sod coming on Friday to replace a spot that the grubs got last year. Reseeded some other areas. 4 yards of mulch into the gardens. Crocuses and early bulbs long gone, daffs still hanging in, tulips getting going. Grape hyacinth smell amazing. Still some forsythia out and DD brought in some cuttings today. Last year, COVID played havoc with bedding plants so I am growing 8 flats of gazania from seed along with a couple of other annuals. Also trying some echinacae from seed. All coming along although the echinacae is slow to get going although my only reference is the annuals. Have done scads of weeding. Finally cut down a large white pine that was slowly dying just behind the back deck. Will plant some veggies at the cottage but not time yet. Lawns have all had their first cuts and fertilizers.
'It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so!' Mark Twain
Mike Scott
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Mike Scott »

After about a month of warm weather and many things flowering and planted, it snowed today and will probably freeze tonight. Will have to wait and see what makes it through.
elle
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by elle »

Finally weeded the garden and got the plants started.

4-5 Swiss chard
1 parsley
1 Italian basil
1 Thai basil
10 tomatoes of 5 varieties
1 sweet pepper
20 sugar snap peas
10 broccoli but they already bolted so I will be pulling those soon
Tried corn but no luck sprouting
1 cucumber
1 zucchini
Fig tree planted last year is looking green but likely no digs
2 more fig trees ready to plant

All in my <4000 sq ft lot.
Bonanza77
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Bonanza77 »

I decided to start a vegetable garden for the first time this year. I have four young kids and figured it would be a good project for all of us to spend time outside together. I read a bunch of books on related topics. A couple of days ago, I installed six 4' x 4' cypress wood raised beds, 16" deep, and had the soil/compost/manure mixture that I settled on delivered and placed in the beds. All of the materials arrived later than I wanted, so we're not getting to plant as early as hoped...nevertheless, everything seemed to be in order. Now, I'm afraid the project is completely ruined.

In my zeal to have the already-rot-resistant cypress wood last even longer, I decided to seal it. Some brief googling revealed linseed oil to be a safe, non-toxic alternative. I go to Home Depot. I search for linseed oil. I find it. I buy it. It took 6-7 hours to stain all the wood.

Today, I found out that the "boiled linseed oil" product I purchased is not just linseed oil that's been heated--it's linseed oil adulterated with certain chemicals to help speed the drying process. The specific drying agent in the product I used is "cobalt manganese salt." Cobalt manganese salt is not safe and harmless, but I can't find a good answer on whether or not this is going to be a problem. I can't determine if there is a risk of this product leeching from the wood to the soil to the vegetables and, if so, if the concentrations would be high enough to be concerning. If this situation is concerning, can I get the soil tested periodically to check for safety and, if so, what should I test it for? Cobalt and manganese, individually, or the cobalt manganese salt, specifically? This project has taken so much time, effort, and money--I am beyond irritated with myself that I may have ruined it completely by using the wrong product.

Any advice would be appreciated. I don't really even know what kind of professional would know the answer to this.
MP173
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by MP173 »

Early garden season surprise...

Last Sept I planted spinach seeds but had little success in the fall. The plants grew but not worthy of picking to consume.

Today I picked a partial of those spinach plants. The plants resumed growing this spring and are now the nicest, most green spinach I can recall growing. My spring planted spinach is at least a month out, so we will be consuming for a couple of weeks, perhaps longer if the plants continue to grow.

Definately will plant spinach again in the fall for overwinter production.

Steak and spinach salad for dinner tonight.

ed
HomeStretch
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by HomeStretch »

MP173 wrote: Sun Apr 25, 2021 5:29 pm ... Definately will plant spinach again in the fall for overwinter production. ...
I had no idea spinach might overwinter but that sounds great. What plant hardiness zone are you in?
maywood
Posts: 272
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Re: Gardening 2021

Post by maywood »

Zone 8a here so everything but okra is already planted.

Red Zebra, I related to a lot of what you said. We only have 1/4 acre, with a pool in the back yard, but no grass in the backyard, the rest is all plants. We have seven 4 x 12 raised beds for veggies, plus various other areas and flower beds. A few years ago I started growing my own veggies from seed under grow lights (mostly cherry and patio tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, kale, squash), also marigold, geraniums and perennials. We also briefly start squash/cucumber/okra indoors before planting outside. I can't say I save money doing that (I spend a LOT on seeds), but it's just so rewarding, I give extras to neighbors, and I like being able to try so many different varieties and like not being at the mercy of local retailers as far as when and what varieties are available. I retired one year ago and spend a lot of time gardening and planning way ahead (just ordered perennial seeds to plant later in the summer inside for planting outside in the fall etc.) I'm trying to get native milkweed established for monarch butterflies (had limited success with cold stratification of seeds last summer, did much better winter sowing outside in January), had some swallowtail caterpillars on parsley last year and this year I planted more parsley, dill and fennel trying to attract swallowtails. Planted sunflowers, gladiolus, basil (bees love the flowers), also have a few roses.

Started a perennial bed last fall and it's blooming beautifully right now (foxglove, gaillardia, iris, salvia, yarrow, dianthus, columbine, shasta daisy yet to bloom.)

maywood
MP173
Posts: 2220
Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2007 6:03 pm

Re: Gardening 2021

Post by MP173 »

HOme stretch:

We are in Zone 5...NW Indiana.

Not an extremely cold winter, but lots of snow this year.

BTW, the spinach salad was great.

Definately going to plant spinach late this summer/early fall.

Ed
HomeStretch
Posts: 6254
Joined: Thu Dec 27, 2018 3:06 pm

Re: Gardening 2021

Post by HomeStretch »

MP173 wrote: Sun Apr 25, 2021 8:13 pm HOme stretch:

We are in Zone 5...NW Indiana.

Not an extremely cold winter, but lots of snow this year.

BTW, the spinach salad was great.

Definately going to plant spinach late this summer/early fall.

Ed
Thanks, sounds like it will work in my zone (6) so I’ll give it a try!
MJS
Posts: 697
Joined: Sat Aug 05, 2017 10:55 pm

Re: Gardening 2021

Post by MJS »

Bonanza77 wrote: Sun Apr 25, 2021 2:46 pm.

Today, I found out that the "boiled linseed oil" product I purchased is not just linseed oil that's been heated--it's linseed oil adulterated with certain chemicals to help speed the drying process. The specific drying agent in the product I used is "cobalt manganese salt." Cobalt manganese salt is not safe and harmless, but I can't find a good answer on whether or not this is going to be a problem. I can't determine if there is a risk of this product leeching from the wood to the soil to the vegetables and, if so, if the concentrations would be high enough to be concerning. If this situation is concerning, can I get the soil tested periodically to check for safety and, if so, what should I test it for? Cobalt and manganese, individually, or the cobalt manganese salt, specifically? This project has taken so much time, effort, and money--I am beyond irritated with myself that I may have ruined it completely by using the wrong product.

Any advice would be appreciated. I don't really even know what kind of professional would know the answer to this.
[Material] Safety Data Sheets include all forms of hazards known to OSHA & otherfederal agencies. https://www.ors.od.nih.gov/sr/dohs/safe ... _main.aspx

The Linseed oil+ cobalt manganese salt MSDS says "This product is NOT classified as hazardous" so you are good to go.
https://www.sunnysidecorp.com/pdfs/SDS_87216.pdf
Mudpuppy
Posts: 6731
Joined: Sat Aug 27, 2011 2:26 am
Location: Sunny California

Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Mudpuppy »

I'm in the process of putting in a 4'x8' raised bed, to go along with my existing 4'x4' and 4'x6' beds. I've had the bed kit for a couple of weeks and I picked up all the garden soil and manure from a big box store this afternoon, but ended up having to work on a different project for the rest of the day. Hopefully, I can get the bed fully in next weekend. It's starting to get a bit late in my part of California to get veggies transplanted.

I've also had rather bad luck with my San Marzano tomato seedlings, with only 1 out of the half dozen seeds still slowly growing, so I picked up a ~10" plant of the same variety from the big box store. I did have better luck with the other seeds. I have some pretty decent "100 super sweet" cherry tomato seedlings and some sweet bell pepper seedlings coming up right now. All of the seeds were all in the same grow environment, so maybe I just got a dud package of seeds for the San Marzano tomatoes.

And since I had bloom rot in my Roma tomatoes a couple of years ago, I picked up some gypsum to augment the soil with more calcium under the San Marzano tomatoes. When I had the Roma bloom rot issue, the pH was good and I was watering on a regular schedule, so that makes me think the soil just needs more calcium.

I'm also planning to re-run my drip irrigation to all beds once I get the new one in. I found a pretty good deal on a 5/8" source line with hose connector preinstalled, so I'll be using that as the main run, then putting 1/4" lines to different parts of the beds. I'm also putting a drip line along the fence to grow sunflowers, simply because it was cool when I had a random sunflower come up from a seed a bird had dropped, so this year I'm going to intentionally plant sunflowers. Last year's random cherry tomato that popped up along the fence line also survived the winter, so I'm letting it continue on.
Ivygirl
Posts: 423
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 1:36 pm

Re: Gardening 2021

Post by Ivygirl »

MP173 wrote: Sun Apr 25, 2021 5:29 pm Early garden season surprise...

Last Sept I planted spinach seeds but had little success in the fall. The plants grew but not worthy of picking to consume.

Today I picked a partial of those spinach plants. The plants resumed growing this spring and are now the nicest, most green spinach I can recall growing. My spring planted spinach is at least a month out, so we will be consuming for a couple of weeks, perhaps longer if the plants continue to grow.

Definately will plant spinach again in the fall for overwinter production.

Steak and spinach salad for dinner tonight.

ed
This happened to me with kale. Puny, gnawed by grasshoppers, barely even there as winter closed in. Delicious and vigorous this spring, even after a truly bitter winter.
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