Gardening 2020

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Mudpuppy
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Mudpuppy »

Kompass wrote: Tue Jun 09, 2020 4:47 pm
dratkinson wrote: Tue Jun 09, 2020 2:16 pm ^^^ Are you growing for a local farmer's market?

Always look forward to sweet corn showing up in local grocery.

A neighbor taught me a lazy way to cook sweet corn is to wrap each shucked ear in a paper towel, wet paper towel, and cook it in a microwave for 3-4 minutes. Sweet. Really.
Even slightly easier is to not shuck it at all, cook the same way. When it is done I just cut off the base and holding the tassel and tips of the leaves with a hot pad squeeze it out the other end, cooked, shucked and ready to eat! :beer
When you don't shuck it first, does it have any issues with popping due to steam buildup or is the excess steam able to escape okay?
Kompass
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Kompass »

Mudpuppy wrote: Tue Jun 09, 2020 7:41 pm
Kompass wrote: Tue Jun 09, 2020 4:47 pm
dratkinson wrote: Tue Jun 09, 2020 2:16 pm ^^^ Are you growing for a local farmer's market?

Always look forward to sweet corn showing up in local grocery.

A neighbor taught me a lazy way to cook sweet corn is to wrap each shucked ear in a paper towel, wet paper towel, and cook it in a microwave for 3-4 minutes. Sweet. Really.
Even slightly easier is to not shuck it at all, cook the same way. When it is done I just cut off the base and holding the tassel and tips of the leaves with a hot pad squeeze it out the other end, cooked, shucked and ready to eat! :beer
When you don't shuck it first, does it have any issues with popping due to steam buildup or is the excess steam able to escape okay?
It vents just fine, been doing this for years and will have it tonight!
Mudpuppy
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Mudpuppy »

Mudpuppy wrote: Sat Jun 06, 2020 2:41 pm
Mudpuppy wrote: Thu Jun 04, 2020 12:19 am Still no signs of germination from my summer squash seeds, so I've started the wet paper towel method of germination to see if any seeds will sprout. Might just be a bad batch.
Two out of the four seeds have germinated using the paper towel method. Now to transplant them outside and see if they still keep going.
Both transplants were successful. I had green leaves during this evening's watering session. When I dug up the original seeds that didn't germinate, it looks like they failed due to insufficient water. The root had emerged, but then then germination stopped. So I amended the soil some more and also started watering twice a day. That seems to have done the trick.
tashnewbie
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by tashnewbie »

This is my first time gardening. I'm doing it in a community garden plot (all raised beds) with a friend.

We harvested our lettuce on Monday. We started a bit late in the season, so they didn't grow as much as they could've, but I was very pleased with how easy this was to grow from seed.

We've got baby tomatoes growing! I hope they'll be ready in a few weeks.

Beans and zucchini and yellow squash plants are growing well, no fruit or beans yet though.
Mudpuppy
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Mudpuppy »

I took advantage of the nice weather today to do some veggie garden maintenance I'd been putting off. I got the drip irrigation system back up and running, so no more needing to lug a hose or watering can around. I put the first layer of mulch around the summer squash and planted a late-start cherry tomato seedling that should keep producing through the first frost. I've also surveyed the damage that last year's cherry tomato did to my PVC trellis, and now I know what I need to repair it.
Teague
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Teague »

Corn as high as an elephant's eye, or about 7 feet.
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Mr. Rumples
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Mr. Rumples »

This is my first year growing potatoes. Harvested some new potatoes the other day; when I was out there today I noticed many were forming good size berries. Apparently, they contain seeds, but I can't find much on how to tell when I should harvest them. I understand that if I can get them to grow they will not be "true" to what I planted.
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LadyGeek
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by LadyGeek »

Unless those potatoes are a "true" species, the seeds won't be like their parents. Google "seeds from hybrid plants".

So I go away for a few days and come home to find that the deer have chomped on most of my garden. My basil, cucumbers, and tomatoes are OK, but the flowers, including my Tiger Lillies, were turned into deer food. :annoyed

I didn't want to put up any tall fencing, as I wanted to look at my garden, not through a fence. I found some deer repellent in my shed, but it's too late for that.

I'll harvest what I can and think about a strategy for next year.
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Mr. Rumples
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Mr. Rumples »

The deer mowed my Swiss Chard down to about 1"; the rabbits have eaten all of the bush beans. We are having a bumper year for rabbits and they don't even run away. There were four of them just munching away on them this evening. Next year I'll stick to pole beans. I agree, I don't want fencing.
sevenseas
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by sevenseas »

The deer came through my vegetable garden a few weeks ago (literally walked right through my raised beds), grazing along the way: chard, shelling pea vines, carrot tops, sunflower leaves, beet greens, bush bean plants, and some nibbles of tomato vines. They visited 3 consecutive nights in a row. :annoyed

The weekend after, I strung up a simple fishing line and bamboo pole "fence" around each bed. Just bamboo poles in each corner, holding a single strand of fishing line about 2 feet above the ground. Keep in mind that it has only been a week since then, but so far, so good. The theory is that deer have poor vision, bump into the line but can't see it, get spooked, and leave. Online reviews have been variable (sometimes the deer seem to 'figure it out' with time), but as someone who also does not want to put up an actual fence, I'm willing to experiment a bit.
Mudpuppy
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Mudpuppy »

I'm glad that we don't have deer in town here. And while I have seen feral rabbits in the neighborhood (color pattern of pet rabbits instead of wild rabbits), the closest has been about a dozen blocks away.

For my garden progress, my neighbor has a leak in her garden irrigation system that sends a flood of water under the fence, so I've been having to weed a lot more than I normally would. It's also caused a bunch of mushrooms to sprout, along with another couple more mystery tomato seedlings (likely cherry tomatoes).

The summer squash are moving along quite nicely after transplanting, and are definitely a shrub-forming cultivar (as I wanted) instead of a vine-forming cultivar, but I'll have to wait until they set fruit to see if I actually received the specific cultivar I ordered.
Conch55
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Conch55 »

Update on my 2020 garden. Have harvested lots of yellow squash, zucchini and cucumbers. Tomatoes are starting to come in. Picked some bell peppers and jalapenos but expect those to increase as the summer heats up. Plenty of basil, just waiting for the tomatoes for caprese and other summer salads. I made my first fresh vegetable donation to the local food bank today.
HomeStretch
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by HomeStretch »

First year I planted container corn... I planted Burpee deck corn in 2 large patio planters. The stalks are 4-1/2 feet tall. There are ears of corn forming in multiple leaf nodes. I am hoping the ears mature soon and the critters leave me a few ears. I plan to add the stalks to some pumpkins as an exterior fall decoration.
Woodshark
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Woodshark »

This year has been an epic fail. The first planting of tomatoes all died due to excessive rain and blight. The second round are thin and struggling to fight the blight left over in the soil. The lettuce was planted too late and went bitter with the heat of summer, even before it was 4 inches tall. The cilantro seemingly bolted overnight and the strawberry plants grew huge, but produced almost nothing.

Oh well. Maybe next year.
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by LadyGeek »

My only two stringless green bean plants came through! I just harvested the first batch, which is a large handful.

Months of planning, watering, nurturing, cajoling, weeding, chasing deer... has culminated in... five minutes in the microwave, with a bit of butter and fresh pressed garlic.

Hopefully, I'll have another batch next week.

My cucumbers and tomatoes are on-track.
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peppers
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by peppers »

Status

Cucumbers: harvesting and exceeding expectations

Italian peppers: harvesting and exceeding expectations

Jalapeno peppers: harvesting and exceeding expectations

Eggplant: trending in a positive direction

Zucchini: trending in a positive direction

San Marzano tomatoes: plump, green and........waiting
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peppers
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by peppers »

LadyGeek wrote: Fri Jul 10, 2020 6:25 pm My only two stringless green bean plants came through! I just harvested the first batch, which is a large handful.

Months of planning, watering, nurturing, cajoling, weeding, chasing deer... has culminated in... five minutes in the microwave, with a bit of butter and fresh pressed garlic

Don't confuse outcome with the strategy. :wink:
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eob616
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by eob616 »

New achievement unlocked: recognizing the signs of squash vine borers and attempting to do something about it. (Ick.) Did some surgery on both butternut squash and zucchini plants, and tried wrapping the rest of the (okay?) stems with foil as a preventative. With my luck, it'll probably end up frying all the healthy stems. Or, more likely, they all have borers even without visible signs.

My tomatoes are underwhelming compared to all the neighbors in my community garden. I started a bit late with smaller homegrown seedlings, but it's a little disheartening.

Cukes and zucchinis are just starting to set some veggies. Chard is still doing okay. Beans are very hit-or-miss to germinate, despite many sowings (some presoaked, some not). Eggplants are just barely not dead yet from some awful bug chomping.

And I'm pretty happy with my PVC trellis!

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Mudpuppy
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Mudpuppy »

eob616 wrote: Sun Jul 12, 2020 8:18 am And I'm pretty happy with my PVC trellis!
Nice trellis. Glad to hear the PVC worked out for you.

And the tomato difference might just be due to when they were started. My "mystery" (now confirmed to be cherry) tomato that sprouted up along the fence line, where my neighbor overwatered on their side of the fence, is now as tall as the fence. The cherry tomato I started inside is only about waist high, but it was started later that the mystery tomato, so I wasn't expecting it to get to monster size yet.

Pests are also a constant annoyance. My grape vine has a new pest this year, one which agricultural companies have been keeping an eye on. But that also means there's pretty clear guidelines on how to deal with them from the UC Integrated Pest Management website, for both large-scale agriculture and for home growers. I'm just waiting for my order of BT to arrive. I'll probably give all the plant leaves a light dusting of BT, since it's also effective against tomato worms and grasshoppers.
MathIsMyWayr
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

eob616 wrote: Sun Jul 12, 2020 8:18 am New achievement unlocked: recognizing the signs of squash vine borers and attempting to do something about it. (Ick.) Did some surgery on both butternut squash and zucchini plants, and tried wrapping the rest of the (okay?) stems with foil as a preventative. With my luck, it'll probably end up frying all the healthy stems. Or, more likely, they all have borers even without visible signs.

My tomatoes are underwhelming compared to all the neighbors in my community garden. I started a bit late with smaller homegrown seedlings, but it's a little disheartening.

Cukes and zucchinis are just starting to set some veggies. Chard is still doing okay. Beans are very hit-or-miss to germinate, despite many sowings (some presoaked, some not). Eggplants are just barely not dead yet from some awful bug chomping.

And I'm pretty happy with my PVC trellis!

Image
You PVC trellis in the picture looks nice. I am not quite happy with circular spiral wire tomatoe cages. Can you share the construction details of your PVC trellis?
Lynette
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Lynette »

Teague wrote: Tue Jun 23, 2020 11:11 am Corn as high as an elephant's eye, or about 7 feet.
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White corn foreground, yellow corn in background.

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Update please. Have you harvested and eaten any corn yet? I have about 6 plants in containers in two rows. One ear of corn showed its head and now has a tassel and silk. I looked up some YouTube videos on how to hand pollinate. I will probably have ears with only a few kernels!
Teague
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Teague »

Happy to oblige. :)

The main harvest was done a few days ago. Here's the truck loaded up and about to head to the homeless shelter/soup kitchen:

Image

So I'd have to call this project a success. There are a few late maturing ears coming due, and there should be another (smaller) crop ready in about 2-3 weeks.

As far as quality, I'd give the end product good marks. Sweet, well pollinated with full ears, better than I thought so think positively about yours! A few random bugs once in a while but nothing major, to be expected I suppose when grown with no pesticides.

Good luck with yours, and let us know how it turns out!
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LadyGeek
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by LadyGeek »

^^^ Nice. 8-)

Today, summer has officially arrived in my back yard. The cicadas have started their distinctive sounds that I look forward to every year. In a few weeks, the katydids should join the chorus.
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Miriam2
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Miriam2 »

Teague wrote: The main harvest was done a few days ago. Here's the truck loaded up and about to head to the homeless shelter/soup kitchen: . . .
Oh Teague! That's incredible, seems like just yesterday we watched you plant your seeds :D Looks delicious!
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eob616
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by eob616 »

MathIsMyWayr wrote: Sun Jul 12, 2020 1:45 pm
eob616 wrote: Sun Jul 12, 2020 8:18 am
And I'm pretty happy with my PVC trellis!

Image
You PVC trellis in the picture looks nice. I am not quite happy with circular spiral wire tomatoe cages. Can you share the construction details of your PVC trellis?
Sure. Each frame is made of 3/4" PVC that I bought from Lowe's in 10-foot lengths. They have shorter, but the longer ones are more cost-effective.

Thanks to Mudpuppy's recommendation upthread, I bought a $15 ratcheting PVC cutter from Amazon. (I actually bought it in advance and brought it with me to Lowe's, in case I couldn't fit the 10-foot PVC in my car, but it just barely fit.) It made cutting everything very easy. I watched YouTube videos to learn how to use it.

For each frame, I cut two 4-foot sides and two 2-foot ends. I also bought a 10-pack of right-angle elbow PVC connectors, for the corners.

I bought a jar of PVC cement to glue the frame together...but was too cheap to buy the wrenches also sold nearby, and then couldn't even get the jar open. No matter. The connectors fit together tightly enough.

Once I assembled the frames, I cut a piece of 2-foot-wide chicken wire to length and zip-tied it to each frame.

For the stand: I bought two 4-foot fence posts (one foot is driven into the ground, so each of the posts in the photo is 3 feet tall above the ground). The community garden had a heavy metal fence post driver that helps with that, but I think a regular mallet would work if you don't want to buy one. I cut a final piece of PVC for a crossbar that's about 5 feet long and lashed it to the top of each fence post with twine. I also bought two endcaps for the crossbar at Lowe's so that bugs and so forth wouldn't crawl in and nest.
Mr. Rumples
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Mr. Rumples »

My first year growing potatoes. So easy and so good. I doubt I will ever buy grocery store potatoes again.
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Miriam2
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Miriam2 »

Mr. Rumples wrote: My first year growing potatoes. So easy and so good. I doubt I will ever buy grocery store potatoes again.
"So easy and so good" . . . consider the spellbinding story of the misfortune of fellow Boglehead Gatorman, the perils of growing vegetables you cannot see until harvest :annoyed

"After many hours of internet research and much reading of gardening books, late last March, I planted potatoes in a container by starting them near the bottom of the container. I used small purple gourmet potatoes I purchased for a premium price at a local artisan garden center and lovingly placed my six plump seed potatoes in my barrel, all of which came up and flourished under my loving ministrations.

With great dedication, I weekly added more mulch as they grew up to promote the growth of side shoots and to enhance my much anticipated harvest. Water on a regular basis, fertilizer every other week, constant and vigilant weed control, I did it all. My wife and I planned the meals we would make, the hash browns, the steamed potatoes swimming in butter, the clouds of mashed purple perfection. I had dreams of my friends all admiring my huge pile of luscious purple tubers as I prepared them a memorable feast. I mused over the best wine to serve with purple potatoes, what meat would make the best accompaniment, what vegetables would best compliment their creamy goodness.

Three days ago, after 110 days of constant loving care, I harvested my crop. I upended my container and began to work through the sandy loam by hand, so as to not damage a single perfect potato. As my hands moved the warm, loamy soil I was rewarded with . . . not one d##n potato, not a single one! AARRGH!"

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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Mr. Rumples »

LOL. Well they are about the only thing that the rabbits haven't gotten to. Having eaten the bush beans, the rabbits now mowed down the pole beans. Fortunately, even that doesn't upset me. I just love gardening. I did let the artichokes bloom; I'm looking forward to harvesting the seeds.
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Elsebet
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Elsebet »

We are temporarily in a rented townhouse after a relocation but the rear deck gets a lot of sun so I have a container garden this year:

2 roma tomatoes
2 cherry tomatoes
2 bell peppers
2 cucumber

I bought the plants in late May and am about to harvest my first tomato and cucumber for my salad today!
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tashnewbie
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by tashnewbie »

Been harvesting bush beans (I think?...green beans) for a few weeks.

We decided to let one artichoke flower because the head was so small. Should happen soon. We may try to harvest seeds.

Harvested 2 cucumbers over the past week.

Harvested 1 okra pod last week. LOL.

Harvesting the first tomato tonight. Deer have been biting some of the green tomatoes.

We may harvest the green cabbage soon.

We've been dealing with an extreme dry spell, so keeping everything happy has been difficult.
Mudpuppy
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Mudpuppy »

Elsebet wrote: Tue Jul 14, 2020 9:41 am We are temporarily in a rented townhouse after a relocation but the rear deck gets a lot of sun so I have a container garden this year:

2 roma tomatoes
2 cherry tomatoes
2 bell peppers
2 cucumber

I bought the plants in late May and am about to harvest my first tomato and cucumber for my salad today!
How are your Roma tomatoes doing? I tried those last year, but ended up with bloom rot on most of them. I've read that means there wasn't enough calcium in the soil. That reading also told me that it's mostly cosmetic and you can cut off the bad end, but I never had enough tomatoes ripe enough at the same time to make a sauce once the bad end was cut off.
LifeIsGood
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What's Eating My Tomatoes ?

Post by LifeIsGood »

About the time a tomato is perfectly ripe and ready to pick I see one or more spots chewed into. My garden has a 5 ft tall fence that has 1/2" x 1/2" mesh attached. There is also a solid piece of wood at the bottom that goes a couple of inches into the soil. Unless a critter is climbing the fence, I can't see how they are getting in. Any chance that birds are doing this?
VERY FRUSTRATING !
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by LadyGeek »

I don't think that's a critter. Consider blight or fruit rot. The white part looks like a mold.

Here's one website: Tomato Fruit Problems
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avenger
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by avenger »

I created these hanging gardens with sweet potato vines to provide some foliage on our fence. Added a drip irrigation system and it’s looking great!


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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by LadyGeek »

^^^ Sorry, the site owners don't allow attachments. You'll have to upload the picture to a file sharing site.

See the wiki: Posting images in the Bogleheads forum
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Elsebet
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Elsebet »

Mudpuppy wrote: Tue Jul 14, 2020 2:33 pm How are your Roma tomatoes doing? I tried those last year, but ended up with bloom rot on most of them. I've read that means there wasn't enough calcium in the soil. That reading also told me that it's mostly cosmetic and you can cut off the bad end, but I never had enough tomatoes ripe enough at the same time to make a sauce once the bad end was cut off.
Romas and other paste tomatoes are very susceptible to blossom end rot due to uneven watering more than anything. There isn't enough moisture in the soil for the minerals to be dispersed evenly and the plant cannot take them up, causing the blossom end rot. I had this same thing happen to my romas a few years ago. Keeping the soil evenly moist is really important. I water mine every day - on super hot days I have had to give each plant an entire gallon of water each, but normally it's about 1/2 gallon every day. Use mulch to help retain moisture in the soil.

In the spring before I plant I save egg shells and dry them out. I grind them into a fine powder and mix a little of that into the soil I plant tomatoes in. Then I keep the soil moisture as even as possible. Make sure to have good drainage if using containers. I also use an organic plant food one they start setting fruit, but make sure to follow the instructions for a container plant to avoid overfeeding.

https://www.hgtv.com/outdoors/flowers-a ... om-end-rot
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Mudpuppy »

Elsebet wrote: Wed Jul 15, 2020 8:46 am
Mudpuppy wrote: Tue Jul 14, 2020 2:33 pm How are your Roma tomatoes doing? I tried those last year, but ended up with bloom rot on most of them. I've read that means there wasn't enough calcium in the soil. That reading also told me that it's mostly cosmetic and you can cut off the bad end, but I never had enough tomatoes ripe enough at the same time to make a sauce once the bad end was cut off.
Romas and other paste tomatoes are very susceptible to blossom end rot due to uneven watering more than anything. There isn't enough moisture in the soil for the minerals to be dispersed evenly and the plant cannot take them up, causing the blossom end rot. I had this same thing happen to my romas a few years ago. Keeping the soil evenly moist is really important. I water mine every day - on super hot days I have had to give each plant an entire gallon of water each, but normally it's about 1/2 gallon every day. Use mulch to help retain moisture in the soil.

In the spring before I plant I save egg shells and dry them out. I grind them into a fine powder and mix a little of that into the soil I plant tomatoes in. Then I keep the soil moisture as even as possible. Make sure to have good drainage if using containers. I also use an organic plant food one they start setting fruit, but make sure to follow the instructions for a container plant to avoid overfeeding.

https://www.hgtv.com/outdoors/flowers-a ... om-end-rot
I water the tomatoes every morning with at least one hour (90 minutes on hot days) of a 1-gph drip irrigation and they were also mulched. I did not amend the soil with calcium though, and this soil is very poor quality. I went with raised beds so I'd have enough volume to add compost, manure, and other soil amendments to even get vegetables growing, but I didn't think about mineral amendments.

I think that's what surprises me most about the "mystery" (cherry) tomato that popped up along the fence line. It's doing so well in the plain soil with just surface mulching and daily watering. But then, cherry tomatoes can be like weeds.
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Re: What's Eating My Tomatoes ?

Post by Mudpuppy »

LifeIsGood wrote: Wed Jul 15, 2020 5:57 am About the time a tomato is perfectly ripe and ready to pick I see one or more spots chewed into. My garden has a 5 ft tall fence that has 1/2" x 1/2" mesh attached. There is also a solid piece of wood at the bottom that goes a couple of inches into the soil. Unless a critter is climbing the fence, I can't see how they are getting in. Any chance that birds are doing this?
VERY FRUSTRATING !
To me, the bottom part looks like bloom rot and the side part looks like insect damage. See the links from Elsebet and LadyGeek for how to address bloom rot.
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Mudpuppy »

So I was a bit of a klutz on Sunday and accidentally broke the hose attachment to my vegetable garden's drip irrigation system. My system uses the older 1/2" OD drip hosing (with 1/4" feeders off to each plant), instead of the current common 5/8" OD. So I had to wait until a replacement 1/2" hose adapter arrived from Amazon, which it did today.

Let me tell you, I forgot how hard it is to manually water all of the plants until I had to do it for the past couple of days. The drip irrigation system makes life so much easier, just turn the timer on, make sure water is coming out of the drip emitters, then get to harvesting and weeding while the drip irrigation system does its thing.

In other updates, my summer squash is the cultivar I wanted. I harvested the first set of squash on Sunday to take a bit of the hydration pressure off of the plants while I was manually watering.
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LadyGeek
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by LadyGeek »

I just harvested my first 2 cucumbers.

With regards to watering, I was relieved to finally get some rain late yesterday. The past two weeks were next to nothing. Hopefully, the dry spell is over. It looks like we'll be getting thunderstorms over the next few days.
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Conch55
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Conch55 »

With regards to watering, I was relieved to finally get some rain late yesterday. The past two weeks were next to nothing.
Similar situation for me, not much rain and extreme heat. My cucumbers have slowed down, squash is peaking but tomato action has been good. Some varieties tolerate the heat better than others. I planted 7 different types and surprisingly (to me) the cherry is doing the worst. Peppers are starting to take off. Jalapeno is loaded up, bell peppers to follow. I'm ready for this heat wave to pass...
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Mudpuppy »

Conch55 wrote: Sun Jul 26, 2020 2:17 pm
With regards to watering, I was relieved to finally get some rain late yesterday. The past two weeks were next to nothing.
Similar situation for me, not much rain and extreme heat. My cucumbers have slowed down, squash is peaking but tomato action has been good. Some varieties tolerate the heat better than others. I planted 7 different types and surprisingly (to me) the cherry is doing the worst. Peppers are starting to take off. Jalapeno is loaded up, bell peppers to follow. I'm ready for this heat wave to pass...
My cherry tomato is doing okay in the heat, although I noticed about half of today's harvest had split on the vine. That's something I notice even when I don't accidentally break the drip irrigation system. I can never keep the cherry tomatoes watered evenly enough to keep them all happy and avoid splitting. However, it produces enough tomatoes to more than counter-act losing some of them to splitting.

I also harvested more squash today. It doesn't look like it's setting any more fruit at the moment, probably a reaction to the break in the drip irrigation system and the summer heat. But I have more than enough in the fridge to last me for a while. Now to decide what I want to do with them in the future so I can prep and freeze appropriately. I'll probably do a mix of sliced for meals and grated for baking.
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kacang
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by kacang »

My 2 tomato plants are planted in an earthbox, the water reservoir is topped up once every few days. This is working out well.

The only problem is I thought I bought a Sungold & Early Girl seedling. Right now, they are both looking like determinates with red, medium-sized tomato. The plants were probably mixed up at the store. Oh well, we still enjoy the tomatoes.
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by sevenseas »

Update on "fishing line" fence to prevent deer foraging: epic fail (I'm sure this doesn't surprise anyone). Took them about 5 days to figure it out, after which they were happily walking through my raised beds and chowing down, as usual. As I told my handyman (when he was installing my new 6' high netting fence), I was delusional to think that I'd stumbled upon a cheap, easy, DIY solution to a problem that has vexed humanity for as long as we have been living adjacent to deer habitats.

Good news: the new fence is not as unsightly as I feared. I look forward to visiting the garden from henceforth and not having to face vegetable carnage each morning.

Harvesting: Sungold, SugarSun, Sweet 100 tomatoes (plentiful), the first beefsteaks (Purple Cherokee and Carbon...may be the most delicious tomatoes I've ever eaten), zucchini (lots), yellow crookneck squash...am having a problem with the new fruit shriveling on the vine after several days (1), Padron peppers (2), orange lunchbox peppers (2), sweet banana peppers, blueberries (third year plants...getting a handful each morning, just enough for my bowl of cereal).

Weather: we also need rain!!! But the tomatoes and peppers are happy.
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by topper1296 »

I may have a problem with my bell pepper plants. The plants themselves have grown a lot, but I only have one pepper growing between both plants. :( I've had an issue with something eating the leaves, but the plant is still growing. Could whatever it is eating the leaves also has eaten what would have been my peppers?

My two zucchini plants have the same issue. They are growing like crazy, but no zucchini? :(
Conch55
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Conch55 »

I may have a problem with my bell pepper plants. The plants themselves have grown a lot, but I only have one pepper growing between both plants. :( I've had an issue with something eating the leaves, but the plant is still growing. Could whatever it is eating the leaves also has eaten what would have been my peppers?

My two zucchini plants have the same issue. They are growing like crazy, but no zucchini?
My bell peppers put out a couple of early fruit and then went dormant but have started to flower and set fruit again. They seem to like the heat. Regarding the zucchini, do you have flowers and pollinators (bees)?
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topper1296
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by topper1296 »

Conch55 wrote: Thu Jul 30, 2020 12:11 pm
I may have a problem with my bell pepper plants. The plants themselves have grown a lot, but I only have one pepper growing between both plants. :( I've had an issue with something eating the leaves, but the plant is still growing. Could whatever it is eating the leaves also has eaten what would have been my peppers?

My two zucchini plants have the same issue. They are growing like crazy, but no zucchini?
My bell peppers put out a couple of early fruit and then went dormant but have started to flower and set fruit again. They seem to like the heat. Regarding the zucchini, do you have flowers and pollinators (bees)?
I had and currently have flowers with the zucchini and I think I have bees around. Hopefully, my bell peppers will perk up again with flowers to fruit. :sharebeer
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by InMyDreams »

Lemon cucumber is alive, sort of growing - but no fruit to be seen.

Black cherry tomato is producing :)

Celebrity keeps plugging along.

Jetstar has recently started adding to the supply.

Mortgage Lifter - a pinky tomato that can have problems with blossom end rot - is as tall as I am, has produced two large tomatoes plus one with blossom end rot :( I too have problems with even watering.

Goliath was planted later than the others, but is working hard to catch up. It has some impressive looking fruit which are starting to get the green-orange cast to them.


Apples should be plentiful this year. Creatures (squirrels and birds) will polish off the grapes in all likelihood. The young plum tree has two plums on it this year. It had more last year.
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by MP173 »

Update:

Bad news - my pepper plants are not producing. Leaves are turning brown and looking pathetic. I think there might have been walnut mixed in with the free composted soil from the city. This occurred once before, about 10 years ago.

More bad news - the bugs have completely destroyed kale and almost gotten the broccoli plants. Happens every year. Dont know why I plant them.

More bad news - deer destroyed most of the sweet potato plants in the park dept community garden...still three vines growing.

More bad news - not much spinach this year. Perhaps this fall.

Good news:
Garlic - harvested 106 and are currently curing in the garage.
Lettuce - Black Seeded Simpson and Buttercrunch keep producing....have not bolted. Been eating since late May. Best year ever. Just planted more as we have a week of cooler weather.
Sugar snap peas - incredible harvest this year. Finished up about 2 weeks ago.
Cucumbers - on fire. Only two plants this year, but producing (and converting to pickles).
Onions - starting to harvest. Reds look great, whites are huge, yellows a little small. Over 100 to harvest.
Leeks - growing strong.
Yellow pole beans - producing heavy.
Forex pole beans - not as heavy as yellow pole beans, but lots of blooms.
Fingerling potatoes - plants look great, no harvest yet.
Yukon Gold potatoes - harvested a couple of plants. Good production.
Red and russets - look good, still in ground.
celery - using a stalk at a time. Great taste.
Carrots - growing, still small fruit.
Swiss chard - not only pretty plants but huge growth.
Popcorn - nice plant growth no ears forming yet...still about a month out.
Spaghetti squash - harvested two giant fruits, about 10 more still green.
Eggplant - one about a week out. Others small but forming.
Radishes - have been very tasty this year. Need to replant.

Picked 14 pounds of blueberries at a berry patch for $1.50 per pound....in the freezer.

A few misses, but overall a strong year. Too bad about the peppers....anyone with suggestions for a last minute "Hail Mary"?

Ed
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Re: Gardening 2020

Post by AerialWombat »

kacang wrote: Sun Jul 26, 2020 3:49 pm My 2 tomato plants are planted in an earthbox, the water reservoir is topped up once every few days. This is working out well.
Do you like the EarthBox system?
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