Gardening 2020

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Topic Author
kacang
Posts: 207
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2018 7:43 am
Location: CA

Gardening 2020

Post by kacang »

Searched but looks like we do not have a thread started for this year yet.

Started some seeds for swiss chards, mustard, collards, kale. First time growing these vegetables, been checking daily for sprouts.

Fig cordon experiment continues. Last November, I cut the trunk of a young fig plant to 16". Last month all the buds still looked dormant. Got anxious and made incisions above two top buds. Now those are swelling a little, yay!

Nasturtiums are taking over the backyard. Used the peppery flowers for salad, leaves in tortellini soup.

Harvested some Meyer lemons and DH made blueberry & lemon jam, yum. Am going to bake some buttermilk bread to go with them for breakfast.

Stuck a broken branch from the blueberry bush in a pot of soil and forgot about it. Now tiny leaves are sprouting from it :)

I will have to think of a better way to protect the catnip plant. A barricade of plastic forks (tines up) have not deterred my neighbors' cats. I don't mind sharing, but please leave some for my cats!
Pu239
Posts: 402
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2018 6:24 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Pu239 »

Given the crisis, gardening is about all there is to look forward to over the short term. Planted peas outside under cover and have several trays of seedlings under the grow light. Looking forward to a big garden this year. Zone 6.
Between the idea And the reality...Between the motion And the act...Falls the Shadow - T. S. Eliot
User avatar
WoodSpinner
Posts: 1903
Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2017 1:15 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by WoodSpinner »

+1 on this thread!

Need some viral relief
Plus the promise of great food!
HawkeyePierce
Posts: 1802
Joined: Tue Mar 05, 2019 10:29 pm
Location: Colorado

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by HawkeyePierce »

My new apartment has a very large south-facing balcony that gets full sun. Besides my usual assortment of herbs I'm considering trying at my hand at some fruit. Possible one of the dwarf apple varieties suitable for container gardening.
User avatar
dwickenh
Posts: 2084
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2015 9:45 pm
Location: Illinois

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by dwickenh »

Returning home from Florida this Sunday and I am looking forward to getting out in the garden and preparing the soil for planting. Anything
will be better than the news we are bombarded with daily. I grow Okra as a main crop and will need to wait for more heat before planting
the seed. I am trying more flowers this year as I received a bag of seeds from a gardener friend in Colorado to try out this year. I was planning
to travel to Alaska on a cruise, but that may be on hold this summer.
The market is the most efficient mechanism anywhere in the world for transferring wealth from impatient people to patient people.” | — Warren Buffett
WhyNotUs
Posts: 1868
Joined: Sun Apr 14, 2013 11:38 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by WhyNotUs »

Ordered seeds from Turtle Tree today and will try to get some greens planted by the end of month.
I own the next hot stock- VTSAX
User avatar
Miriam2
Posts: 3286
Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2014 11:51 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Miriam2 »

Zone 10, South Florida here, in tropical paradise 8-) Pinwheel jasmine bursting out with dark green leaves and large white flowers. 7 orchids bursting with blooms (I keep them hanging under the oak trees year round). Yellow Tabebuia trees are covered with golden yellow blossoms. Already pruned most of my plants for the spring. All 11 trees and palms on our half acre were pruned by a certified arborist in January. Don't ask how much it cost. All right - $3,500 which included chipping and hauling away truck-loads of branches. Took two days. That's what HCOL area means.

Just finished the first major fertilizing of the year, took me all day. Dragged DH out to help :D Palm special 8-2-12 made locally for Florida soils - use it on everything except lawn and ground covers. I can't use it on bougainvilleas because I no longer have any bougainvilleas because those dang iguanas ate them all - flowers, leaves, and even stems and thorns :annoyed
John Bogle, "The Twelve Pillars of [Financial] Wisdom"- Pillar 7: The Powerful Magnetism of the Mean. Reversion to the mean prevails, sooner or later, in the financial jungle.
User avatar
LadyGeek
Site Admin
Posts: 69997
Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 5:34 pm
Location: Philadelphia
Contact:

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by LadyGeek »

^^^ The iguanas thank you for those tasty snacks. :)

The stars have aligned. The internet says that today is the first day to plant seeds in the Philadelphia area.

It's a beautiful day and I just started a 30 day leave of absence from work due to coronavirus. I've scoped out the areas for my 2020 garden.

Starting indoors are:
  • Tomatoes (Delicious)
  • Beans (Stringless Green Pod)
  • Cucumbers (Straight Eight)
  • Basil (Genovese)
  • Sunflowers (Mammoth) - Leftover seeds from my failed experiment last year. The seeds were dated 1989, so I'm starting them inside under controlled conditions.
All of the seeds are either in peat pots or a plastic tray. The soil is seed starter mix.

Everything is inside 2 x 20 gallon aquariums, so I don't need to worry about over-watering. Once they sprout, I have an LED light that fits over the top of the tanks.

Starting them inside will allow me time to prepare the areas I want to use.

No gloves or masks were used in this process. Working with soil directly is inspirational. It's good for your mind and good for your soul.
Wiki To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.
MrsRoos
Posts: 150
Joined: Thu Sep 15, 2016 4:14 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by MrsRoos »

Can't go to the nursery, so just started seeds a couple weeks back for these and seeing some sprouts :happy

Food
- Brandywine tomatoes - orange and red varietals
- Swiss chard
- Beets
- Basil Genovese

Flowers for pollination and aesthetics
- Oriental and California poppies
- Zinnia
- Lupine

Where are folks purchasing seeds online?
“Anyone who believes in indefinite growth in anything physical, on a physically finite planet, is either mad or an economist.” - Kenneth Boulding
User avatar
jabberwockOG
Posts: 2385
Joined: Thu May 28, 2015 7:23 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by jabberwockOG »

Deep south report here - we've had a fantastic spring with no late freezes so garden is going gang busters. Its all about starting early here because the bugs and heat pretty much make the garden pretty feeble for Mid June, July and August. We've got strong bushy pole beans 12-18 inches high about to start throwing up tendrils to climb the trellis. Tomatoes about 3 feet high and bushy with a few tomatoes already set - already an inch or two diameter. Eggplant 2 ft high but no blossoms. Two pepper plants 2 ft high ready to blossom. Spring onions ready to harvest now. Our last crop of lettuce before summer heat coming in is about 2 inches high - will start using it as soon as it hits 6-8 inches until it bolts in mid May.
raveon
Posts: 206
Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2007 10:32 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by raveon »

Zone9b, California:

This year, I have started the following seeds indoors under grow lights.

1. Succulents (getting excellent germination and they are growing well)
2. Liliput Zinnia (super good germination/growth)
3. Petite Marigolds (2nd packet of seeds, 1st pack didn't germinate well at all)
4. Vinca (decent germination/growth)
5. Impatients (very slow to germinate, not that good)

Outdoors, johnny jump ups / violas / pansy / snapdragons are doing very well as I started them indoors late fall last year.

I've also done propagation (w/ hormone root growth) of the following plants which have done well:

1. Million Bells
2. Lantana
3. African daisy

Gerbera daisy has been slow to grow.
Where are folks purchasing seeds online?
I buy from http://ParkSeed.com
peppers
Posts: 1499
Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2011 7:05 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by peppers »

Jalapeno and Bell pepper plants are coming along nicely inside. I would like to have them in the garden by mid-May but that depends on the weather situation. The current 10 day outlook suggests possibility of snow next week. Groan.

Poor Miriam and her iguana friends. :wink:
"..the cavalry ain't comin' kid, you're on your own..."
Rus In Urbe
Posts: 645
Joined: Sat Dec 09, 2017 2:12 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Rus In Urbe »

*
So this is where the Boglehead Gardeners hang out! Howdy!

I'm having MAJOR ZONE ENVY reading these posts.

We're Upstate NY in 5.5 zone, we're just getting the daffodils opening and the forsythia are like a blast of sunshine. My two Ocracoke Island figs (that overwintered on the back porch) are putting out tiny green buds and the Russian Kale is apparently a perennial and we'll be having a kale salad soon. Otherwise, it's sodden earth and about to plant. We'll be putting out arugula, breakfast radishes and lettuces soon. Tomatoes and such (from starts at the Farmer's Market) won't be set out u until May. Meanwhile, lots of soil prep and turning of the Compost.

CHEERS to all. Rus In Urbe. (ie. "Country in the City"). :beer
I'd like to live as a poor man with lots of money. ~Pablo Picasso
User avatar
Miriam2
Posts: 3286
Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2014 11:51 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Miriam2 »

Miriam2 wrote: Just finished the first major fertilizing of the year, took me all day. Dragged DH out to help :D Palm special 8-2-12 made locally for Florida soils - use it on everything except lawn and ground covers. I can't use it on bougainvilleas because I no longer have any bougainvilleas because those dang iguanas ate them all - flowers, leaves, and even stems and thorns :annoyed
LadyGeek wrote: Mon Apr 06, 2020 3:23 pm ^^^ The iguanas thank you for those tasty snacks. :) LadyGeek - no, they have no manners :annoyed
peppers wrote: Poor Miriam and her iguana friends. :wink:
Friends?#*@!

Image

It's an iguana invasion down here, a "green plague" destroying all gardens great and beautiful :annoyed
Last edited by Miriam2 on Tue Apr 07, 2020 6:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
John Bogle, "The Twelve Pillars of [Financial] Wisdom"- Pillar 7: The Powerful Magnetism of the Mean. Reversion to the mean prevails, sooner or later, in the financial jungle.
Sagefemme
Posts: 119
Joined: Mon Mar 12, 2018 9:31 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Sagefemme »

I have spent the last few days doing garden maintenance that has been deferred for many years (amazing what furlough from work results in). Pruned many overgrown shrubs and trees. Removed some perennials that have seen better days. Spread truckload after truckload of blended mint compost over every planning bed. Tomorrow I will plant a bunch of shrubs and perennials I have in pots, or from divisions. I am looking forward to the best mixed perennial garden in years, all due to viral cessation of work!
User avatar
TierArtz
Posts: 464
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2017 10:33 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by TierArtz »

I tilled the garden (30x30') and adjusted the irrigation zones.

Including pots outside of the garden, wife and kids planted radishes, tomatoes, jalapeno and medium banana peppers (those two are mine), bell peppers, cucumbers, pumpkin, water melon, broccoli, egg plant, cotton (for school projects), and probably a few I'm forgetting. In the orchard we have lemons, limes, oranges, grapefruit, apricot, nectarine, plumbs, and pomegranate. We should harvest everything but the latter.
squirm
Posts: 3133
Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2011 11:53 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by squirm »

got everything planted a few weeks ago. we're watering every other day now.
itmaybejj
Posts: 58
Joined: Thu Dec 19, 2019 8:01 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by itmaybejj »

Miriam2 wrote: Mon Apr 06, 2020 8:30 pm Friends?#*@!

It's an iguana invasion down here, a "green plague" destroying all gardens great and beautiful :annoyed
I couldn't do it, but if you could: you could have the highest return on investment garden on the board!
http://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/browardco/201 ... y-in-mind/


Meanwhile up in the epicenter of the pandemic grocery delivery is hard to come by and I don't want to go inside the store. But compost delivery is readily available, so we went all WW2-victory-garden and ripped up a big chunk of the yard. Will mostly be lettuce, green beans, broccoli and peas with some interesting odds and ends on trial: celtuce, bok choy, Malabar spinach... And we have lots of mature berry bushes and some fruit trees. I spend more time gardening than investing.
Mr. Rumples
Posts: 1132
Joined: Sun Aug 25, 2019 7:16 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Mr. Rumples »

As mentioned above, I too have spent a lot of time in maintenance. This week removed two huge 8' euonymus shrubs that were planted too close together; transplanted a snowball viburnum that I had started by sticking a cutting in the ground last year (viburnums grow like weeds on my property; I now have four varieties) and I dare anyone to find a weed anywhere as I look for something to do. My Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus) (similar to an artichoke) is already growing like crazy.

I'm braiding a waxy leaf ligustrum as a novelty in the front yard. These are almost nuisance plants here, but I thought I would save this one.
User avatar
ThunderTurtle
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Feb 08, 2019 11:47 am
Location: Texas

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by ThunderTurtle »

I decided to stop growing thing we don't love so this year it's all cantaloupe and watermelon. :)

Hoping to get our first harvest of peaches from our little fruit tree: https://www.amazon.com/Grow-Little-Frui ... 1612120547
Conch55
Posts: 365
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2016 11:03 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Conch55 »

I started cucumber, yellow squash, zucchini, basil and cilantro seeds several weeks ago. I picked up 7 varieties of tomatoes this morning. Cleaned up the garden and hope to plant around 1 May. Zone 7B.
TheGreyingDuke
Posts: 1836
Joined: Fri Sep 02, 2011 10:34 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by TheGreyingDuke »

Rus In Urbe wrote: Mon Apr 06, 2020 4:34 pm *
She Russian Kale is apparently a perennial and we'll be having a kale salad soon.
Not a perennial but a biannual, sometime late Spring it will put out a flower/seed stalk. But if you start some kale now (indoors) and plant it out come April 20 or so, you could have an uninterrupted supply of kale.
"Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race." H.G. Wells
Lynette
Posts: 2098
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2014 9:47 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Lynette »

Zone 6. I planted some beans, beets and radishes outside - likely too soon. This morning I went out to water them and it looked as if the soil in the containers had been disturbed. It was probably the bloody squirrels. This is my first year planting seeds inside and I learning many things I am doing wrong - like planting them too close. Years ago I planted a maple tree right in the middle of the pathway and the fence with my neighbor. Last year I looked closely at the hostas under my trees - full of aphids - or something else. So I threw out hostas but cannot get the lawn to grow well under the tree. So yesterday I moved some shrubs from the backyard and planted them around the drip line of the tree. I plan to put down mulch in this area. I will see next year. It is either mulch or the tree. Someone suggested ground cover. I hate, hate, hate ground cover. It is OK if ground cover has natural borders such as a fence but in the open I find I am continually having to pull out all of the spreading runners.
mouses
Posts: 4217
Joined: Sat Oct 24, 2015 12:24 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by mouses »

itmaybejj wrote: Tue Apr 07, 2020 6:36 am
Meanwhile up in the epicenter of the pandemic grocery delivery is hard to come by
My brother in fly over country says, Can't you order delivery 2-3 days ahead? No, dear, peapod's slots are booked solid for the two weeks they have them, amazon/whole foods has zero slots available.

I have stuff ready for planting when it warms up. I hear seed companies are getting many new orders from people tired of seeing supermarket shelves empty or wanting to lessen the risk of contagion. Victory gardens all over again. All to the good if the gardening is long term.
sevenseas
Posts: 211
Joined: Tue May 28, 2013 8:44 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by sevenseas »

Zone 5B, Catskills NY.

In February had winter-sown perennial seeds in gallon milk jugs, which are just starting to sprout. Calendula, sweet peas, shelling peas, hollyhock, columbine, snapdragons, foxglove, ageratum.

This week, seeded radishes, shelling peas, several beet varieties in a raised bed. Have cedar planks on order to add two new raised beds, for summer vegetables and cutting garden. Will start tomatillo, zinnia, cosmos seeds in milk jugs this week.

The daffodils and grape hyacinths are just starting to bloom, forsythia is in full bloom, garden perennials are starting to emerge. I am most excited about the Virginia bluebells which were planted as bare root plants last spring, they are doing great and already have flower buds forming.
Lynette
Posts: 2098
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2014 9:47 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Lynette »

mouses wrote: Tue Apr 07, 2020 7:24 am
itmaybejj wrote: Tue Apr 07, 2020 6:36 am
Meanwhile up in the epicenter of the pandemic grocery delivery is hard to come by
My brother in fly over country says, Can't you order delivery 2-3 days ahead? No, dear, peapod's slots are booked solid for the two weeks they have them, amazon/whole foods has zero slots available.

I have stuff ready for planting when it warms up. I hear seed companies are getting many new orders from people tired of seeing supermarket shelves empty or wanting to lessen the risk of contagion. Victory gardens all over again. All to the good if the gardening is long term.
Maybe I should rip up my front lawn and plant beans, tomatoes and sweet corn there. My city is fussy but I can claim it is my patriotic duty. Lawn services are not allowed to operate in my state during the stay-at-home order.
User avatar
LadyGeek
Site Admin
Posts: 69997
Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 5:34 pm
Location: Philadelphia
Contact:

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by LadyGeek »

There's no need to rip up your lawn. See: stop ripping up your lawn to grow veggies
Wiki To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.
TheGreyingDuke
Posts: 1836
Joined: Fri Sep 02, 2011 10:34 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by TheGreyingDuke »

Lynette wrote: Tue Apr 07, 2020 7:32 am Maybe I should rip up my front lawn and plant beans, tomatoes and sweet corn there. My city is fussy but I can claim it is my patriotic duty. Lawn services are not allowed to operate in my state during the stay-at-home order.
Not sure if you were being facetious but corn needs to be grown in fairly large blocks of one variety in order to ensure pollination. The usual minimum is blocks of 4-6 rows extending at least 15 feet.

I am a Master Gardener and the demand for our courses has multiplied exponentially; we are doing them all online and when in the past we might expect 35-40 people we are getting 150 attending. What was anticipated t be a financial bust has proven to be quite lucrative. The better to support our comprehensive giveaways.
"Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race." H.G. Wells
Rus In Urbe
Posts: 645
Joined: Sat Dec 09, 2017 2:12 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Rus In Urbe »

THanks, TheGreyingDuke. Nice to know!
Rus In Urbe wrote:
The Russian Kale is apparently a perennial and we'll be having a kale salad soon.

TheGreyingDuke wrote:
Not a perennial but a biannual, sometime late Spring it will put out a flower/seed stalk. But if you start some kale now (indoors) and plant it out come April 20 or so, you could have an uninterrupted supply of kale.
Cheers! Rus. :beer
I'd like to live as a poor man with lots of money. ~Pablo Picasso
Lynette
Posts: 2098
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2014 9:47 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Lynette »

TheGreyingDuke wrote: Tue Apr 07, 2020 7:44 am
Lynette wrote: Tue Apr 07, 2020 7:32 am Maybe I should rip up my front lawn and plant beans, tomatoes and sweet corn there. My city is fussy but I can claim it is my patriotic duty. Lawn services are not allowed to operate in my state during the stay-at-home order.
Not sure if you were being facetious but corn needs to be grown in fairly large blocks of one variety in order to ensure pollination. The usual minimum is blocks of 4-6 rows extending at least 15 feet.

I am a Master Gardener and the demand for our courses has multiplied exponentially; we are doing them all online and when in the past we might expect 35-40 people we are getting 150 attending. What was anticipated t be a financial bust has proven to be quite lucrative. The better to support our comprehensive giveaways.
Actually I was being facetious about digging up my front lawn but not about planting sweet corn. I have some corn seeds and several 5 ft buckets. I know that corn has to pollinated by the wind. So my idea was to have rows of sweet corn in two buckets next to one another. I will see if they get pollinated!
Lynette
Posts: 2098
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2014 9:47 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Lynette »

LadyGeek wrote: Tue Apr 07, 2020 7:39 am There's no need to rip up your lawn. See: stop ripping up your lawn to grow veggies
Hi Lady Geek,

I was being facetious as I do not think my fussy city would approve. I live in an area where little houses like mine have been torn down for +1million dollar McMansions. Having a perfect lawn is a requirement. I am wondering what is going to happen if our governor extends our stay at home order. Lawn service is not allowed in Michigan and most of my neighbors work during the day and have these lawn services ride over their lawn with giant machines that compact the soil.

In November I completed the course to become a Master Gardener. Now I know how little I know and am trying to learn more by experience.
4th and Inches
Posts: 243
Joined: Mon Nov 12, 2012 8:53 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by 4th and Inches »

I live in the Colorado Front Range. It is supposed to get down to 24 on Sunday night. I'd like to get early greens as soon as feasible. Do you think planting spinach/lettuce/kale/swiss chard is a good idea or should I wait with an upcoming low of 24? I know that those plants are not like beans, tomatoes, peppers, but is that too cold?
NoblesvilleIN
Posts: 141
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2018 6:04 pm
Location: Noblesville IN

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by NoblesvilleIN »

I have had success helping my corn pollinate. When you notice the pollen starting to fall from the tassels, go out and gently shake the corn stalks. This causes the pollen to distribute. You might want to wear a cloth mask when you do this, I end up in a coughing fit from the pollen overload. I grow short blocks of corn and have had success with this method.

Zone 6A, central Indiana. Started tomatoes (6 varieties) and sweet peppers (also 6 varieties) in February on a heat mat, moving to grow lights. I moved them to a cold frame this weekend and hope to plant in early May. Transplanted lettuce, cabbage (red & green), broccoli, onions, leeks, and swiss chard week before last - all started indoors from seed. Transplanted parsley and chives this week. Have dill, basil, thyme, and flowers also under cold frame.

Seed potatoes came in this week and I have them spread out to pre-sprout. I hope to cut them up into small pieces and get them in the ground later this week or early next week. This is a couple weeks later for me because the local supplier was back ordered. I find it is cheaper to buy seed potatoes locally rather than mail order. My seeds come mail order. I keep seed packets for several years before I need to re-supply.
NoblesvilleIN
Posts: 141
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2018 6:04 pm
Location: Noblesville IN

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by NoblesvilleIN »

by 4th and Inches » Tue Apr 07, 2020 9:38 am

I live in the Colorado Front Range. It is supposed to get down to 24 on Sunday night. I'd like to get early greens as soon as feasible. Do you think planting spinach/lettuce/kale/swiss chard is a good idea or should I wait with an upcoming low of 24? I know that those plants are not like beans, tomatoes, peppers, but is that too cold?
What you are planning on planting is somewhat cold tolerant. If you are direct seeding, it will be several days for the seeds to germinate anyway. Soil temperature plays a role in how fast the seeds will germinate. I would go ahead and seed a short row of each. Most you are out is a few seeds and a few minutes of outdoor time. In a couple of weeks do another planting of short rows.
Lynette
Posts: 2098
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2014 9:47 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Lynette »

NoblesvilleIN wrote: Tue Apr 07, 2020 8:49 am I have had success helping my corn pollinate. When you notice the pollen starting to fall from the tassels, go out and gently shake the corn stalks. This causes the pollen to distribute. You might want to wear a cloth mask when you do this, I end up in a coughing fit from the pollen overload. I grow short blocks of corn and have had success with this method.

Zone 6A, central Indiana. Started tomatoes (6 varieties) and sweet peppers (also 6 varieties) in February on a heat mat, moving to grow lights. I moved them to a cold frame this weekend and hope to plant in early May. Transplanted lettuce, cabbage (red & green), broccoli, onions, leeks, and swiss chard week before last - all started indoors from seed. Transplanted parsley and chives this week. Have dill, basil, thyme, and flowers also under cold frame.

Seed potatoes came in this week and I have them spread out to pre-sprout. I hope to cut them up into small pieces and get them in the ground later this week or early next week. This is a couple weeks later for me because the local supplier was back ordered. I find it is cheaper to buy seed potatoes locally rather than mail order. My seeds come mail order. I keep seed packets for several years before I need to re-supply.
Thanks for the tip about the corn. I have ordered cloth masks from various sources as I am too lazy to make one so hopefully I will have some by May. I was also toying with the idea of getting a cold frame but then Covid 19 arrived so that idea will have to wait till next year. I am excited that some more of my grow lights will be arriving this evening. I see that my bare root strawberry plants will arrive in the next day or two. I will have to look up to see if I can plant them now or store them temporarily in my fridge.

I always wake up early so I am at Home Depot at 6:00 a.m. Before they started limiting numbers of people I saw that they had a stand with vegetable plants that included strawberries. It was outside the store. They also had mulch that I need on a stand inside the store but I decided that the mulch could wait.
squirm
Posts: 3133
Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2011 11:53 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by squirm »

We tried various vegetables last year at our place in Idaho. Had some luck but think we need better soil.
likegarden
Posts: 3045
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 5:33 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by likegarden »

I got my outside plantings cleaned up - 15 paper bags of debris. Before that I had a tree service cut down 2 huge white pines which were dropping too many branches, and thereafter used the woodchips for mulch in my backyard.
But I am gardening in my basement since last year, have bushy hosta seedlings since November from seeds in 4 trays = 72 streaked hostas under 24 hours light. In 3 weeks there should no longer be a chance of night frost, so I can bring them to my patio, then spray them with Liquid Fence against any rabbit. You all have fun with gardening!

added : on April 28 I brought the Hosta seedlings outside on the deck, outside temperature at night will be above a safe 35 degrees. I kept only the best looking plants, all are streaked, repotted them in larger pots, 32 in 4 trays. They are looking great, will be planted in the seedling section of my garden in August.
Last edited by likegarden on Wed Apr 29, 2020 4:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
InMyDreams
Posts: 964
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2017 11:35 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by InMyDreams »

I went to Home Depot this morning (braving the viral world out there) specifically to buy Snow Pea seeds. None. Now, I know it's kinda late to be planting them, but really - none??

Bought two tomato plants (but will need to protect against frost).

Started an AeroGarden a week ago - I'll be able to grow lettuce thru the summer in my basement.
mouses
Posts: 4217
Joined: Sat Oct 24, 2015 12:24 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by mouses »

Be careful of big box stores. Often the plants they sell have been treated with that stuff that kills bees.

I believe there have been several lawsuits when a town has tried to enforce no vegetable gardens in the front yard regulations, and the towns always lost.

I'm glad my state is allowing grass cutting services. I'm too old to cut mine, so it would be feet high. I don't know why they'd prohibit this, as one guy working alone is not violating social distancing.
itmaybejj
Posts: 58
Joined: Thu Dec 19, 2019 8:01 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by itmaybejj »

LadyGeek wrote: Tue Apr 07, 2020 7:39 am There's no need to rip up your lawn. See: stop ripping up your lawn to grow veggies
So true! Good advice. I've done that in the past and it worked well.

I was feeling cheap this year though with all that's going on; I figured it would cost me about half as much if I used the existing topsoil instead of layering over with fresh soil....so I shoveled the grass layer off, threw down a yard or so of inexpensive municipal compost, and then jumped on a shovel a bit to till up my topsoil into a double raised bed with an alley.

But I'm keeping the old grass layer and composting it. So it will go back on eventually, and hopefully no nutrients will be lost in the long run.




...and thank you for all you do for this forum. So appreciated.
nolapepper
Posts: 213
Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2015 3:06 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by nolapepper »

Zone 9 New Orleans.

With the virus situation so bad down here, I don't want to go outside shopping. I run out of veggies so I started microgreen. It is fun. Anybody doing micro green outdoor (with or without tray)?
MP173
Posts: 2197
Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2007 6:03 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by MP173 »

NW Indiana - Zone 5b.

A little late start but rolling now. We have a 500 sf home garden and participate in two community gardens, one about 140 ft and the other about the same.

Inside seeds growing - tomatoes, Marconi Peppers, Lunchpail peppers, cauliflower, broccoli.

Outside - since March 31st - sugar snap peas, lettuce, spinach, radishes, kale seeds and cauliflower seeds.

Will be ordering onion transplants - storage reds, whites, and yellows, plus leeks. Will plant those in about 10 days.

Potatoes a little later then after Mothers Day quite a abit - tomatoes, peppers, sweet potatoes (later), carrots, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, morelettuce and spinach (plant every 10 days) til June then transition to heat resistant lettuce. Also Forex Pole Beans mid may.

I have 96 garlic plants from last October - all about 4" tall.

Probably more, but cant think of it now.

Ed
Clueless
Posts: 22
Joined: Thu May 25, 2017 10:47 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by Clueless »

Huge fan of Square Foot Gardening by Mel Bartholomew.

All of the herbs are sprawling, super sweet 100 cherry tomatoes are starting to flower, eggplant and potatoes are being shy, onions are taking off, and the fruit is flowering (Meyer lemons, blackberries, and strawberries). I even found a ripe strawberry out there today.

I wish I had more room to dedicate to the garden, but the pups love to run.
texaspapas
Posts: 116
Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2014 7:03 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by texaspapas »

Hummer man myself. If it's good for migrating/endemic hummers, I'll plant it. Tropical sage, Texas betony, Autumn sage, Lantanas, Tropical milkweed (and other milkweeds), Native foxgloves, Mealy blue sage, Yellow bells, Standing cypress (and any other good wildflowers I can get going in our public spaces), Yuccas, Carolina jessamine, Coral honeysuckle, and of course the big daddy--Turk's cap, and others I'm forgetting. My wife would go shopping at the grocery store even if it meant a certain, bloody death by Ebola, so there's less motivation for food gardening in me. And man I sure do like the hummingbirds. Big migration happening right now through my region, great to watch.
3hrs
Posts: 40
Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2017 6:33 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by 3hrs »

NH Zone 5a here. We still have patches of snow! Garlic and rhubarb are just poking up. Indoor starts include tomatoes,peppers, basil, and dill that were seeded last week, and next week I'll do summer squash and cucumbers. Green beans will be direct seeded in late May, and the transplants will go into the garden June 1. Today I dug up our 30 year old asparagus patch (8' x 15') that's dropped production the past few years. Tomorrow I'll replant the best of the +150 crowns and hope they take. Sure was fun getting back to digging in the garden.
Last edited by 3hrs on Thu Apr 09, 2020 3:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
InMyDreams
Posts: 964
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2017 11:35 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by InMyDreams »

texaspapas wrote: Wed Apr 08, 2020 12:41 am Hummer man myself. If it's good for migrating/endemic hummers, I'll plant it. Tropical sage, Texas betony, Autumn sage, Lantanas, Tropical milkweed (and other milkweeds), Native foxgloves, Mealy blue sage, Yellow bells, Standing cypress (and any other good wildflowers I can get going in our public spaces), Yuccas, Carolina jessamine, Coral honeysuckle, and of course the big daddy--Turk's cap, and others I'm forgetting. My wife would go shopping at the grocery store even if it meant a certain, bloody death by Ebola, so there's less motivation for food gardening in me. And man I sure do like the hummingbirds. Big migration happening right now through my region, great to watch.
Hummer Man - In my area, the hummers like trumpet vine, honeysuckle, most forms of Agastache. The last grows in alkaline soil, so may not be an option in your area.

I have found that cats figure out how to take out hummers that are feeding at low lying bushes. My late cat took about two seasons to perfect her technique - I had to stop growing the agastache.
InMyDreams
Posts: 964
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2017 11:35 am

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by InMyDreams »

One veg plot has been turned with new compost in it, and the first row of snow peas are in. Need to plant another row, and then some green beans.

Can't grow corn - either the raccoons or squirrels took out my last attempt. :x
hbdad
Posts: 143
Joined: Fri Dec 13, 2019 3:29 pm

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by hbdad »

Hi all,

I have a flying insect problem in my yard and was hoping someone here might be able to help. I started a new thread for my issue. Thanks for your help.

viewtopic.php?f=11&t=311479
User avatar
LadyGeek
Site Admin
Posts: 69997
Joined: Sat Dec 20, 2008 5:34 pm
Location: Philadelphia
Contact:

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by LadyGeek »

LadyGeek wrote: Mon Apr 06, 2020 3:23 pm ...The stars have aligned. The internet says that today is the first day to plant seeds in the Philadelphia area.

It's a beautiful day and I just started a 30 day leave of absence from work due to coronavirus. I've scoped out the areas for my 2020 garden.

Starting indoors are:
  • Tomatoes (Delicious)
  • Beans (Stringless Green Pod)
  • Cucumbers (Straight Eight)
  • Basil (Genovese)
  • Sunflowers (Mammoth) - Leftover seeds from my failed experiment last year. The seeds were dated 1989, so I'm starting them inside under controlled conditions.
All of the seeds are either in peat pots or a plastic tray. The soil is seed starter mix.

Everything is inside 2 x 20 gallon aquariums, so I don't need to worry about over-watering. Once they sprout, I have an LED light that fits over the top of the tanks.

Starting them inside will allow me time to prepare the areas I want to use.

No gloves or masks were used in this process. Working with soil directly is inspirational. It's good for your mind and good for your soul.
I have sprouts!!! :happy It's just the tomatoes and cucumbers, but I'm calling this my official start.

While I was waiting for my local supermarket to open, there was a rack of plants by the front door. On an impulse, purchased two "Beef tomato" plants. I was hedging my bets, as the Home Depot had nothing last week. (It might be too soon due to the temperature.) I'll keep them inside until the weather gets warmer.

FYI - We had a hard freeze last night and the night before.
Wiki To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.
p14175
Posts: 408
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:33 am
Location: Now in southeast Arizona

Re: Gardening 2020

Post by p14175 »

After two years I'm finally getting a garden going again. I am trying out the 'weedless gardening', Lee Reich, in Zone 8 high desert. We have better soil here than we had in the Phoenix metro area, plus it's cooler.

Sunflowers already in the ground
Tomatoes - Yellow Pear and Purple Russian
Peppers - Golden Marconi and Anaheim
Squash - Zucchini first planting and Lemon second planting
Melons - Ginger's Pride first planting and Jefferson second planting
Assorted lettuces between between melon and squash plantings.
Post Reply