Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

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sunny_socal
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Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by sunny_socal »

My 2015 accord is about to hit 100k miles. On our older Hondas maintenance at this milestone was pretty simple since the timing belt needed changing. At the same time it was cost effective to change the water pump and serpentine belt at the same time and do an ATF flush. New plugs at the same time.

But my accord doesn't have a timing belt and it's a stick shift. Are there any 'big ticket' items I should take care of? I'm thinking of the serpentine belt at least, possibly the water pump. How long can I push the plugs?

FWIW I do oil changes every 5k miles, air filter changes every 20k miles (about 1x/year.) I believe in preventive maintenance rather than waiting for something to fail.
hulburt1
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by hulburt1 »

2004 civic..190000 will not stop. I have a car all pick out when it's time. Well that was 2015 maybe next year. Mine is using oil about a quart every 3 weeks. so my cost is $3.99 for oil. :sharebeer
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by jebmke »

I have a 2008 RAV4 with about the same miles. I recently changed the brake fluid. My mechanic uses synthetic for oil changes and told me that 8-10K is fine for oil changes. If I am off paved roads much, I change after ~8K; if I have been mostly highway & paved roads I will push to 10-11K.

I had coolant flushed and replaced with the water pump went out at 80K -- otherwise, I'd probably do that now too.

They will tell me when the brakes are ready to be replaced.
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Omalley
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by Omalley »

You should review your owner manual for suggested maintenance. I would expect the manual to mention suggested replacement timing for the spark plugs, but not necessarily the belt and water pump. The longer the original spark plugs stay in place, chances of a problem replacing a seized spark plug increase. At some point, you are better off leaving the original spark plugs in place instead of attempting a replacement.

As for the belt, I keep the original belts in place until they fail. Replacement belts often last for a much shorter period of time. I would inspect the belt monthly for nicks/cracks and install a replacement belt when the original one is showing noticeable changes in condition.

Maybe I have been lucky, but I have only had one water pump failure in over 30 years of driving vehicles (50% of time over 100k mileage). While there is never a good time for a car to break down, it seems like this is a unlikely event.
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sk2101
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by sk2101 »

MT fluid change. Typically every 30-60K miles. See what interval Honda recommends.

Although spark plugs nowadays last a long time, I would not push them beyond 100K miles. Reason is they start to get stuck on the engine head and you may do damage to the threads when removing them. Plus they are so cheap that it is not worth delaying.
Last edited by sk2101 on Wed Jul 24, 2019 8:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by Jack FFR1846 »

I tend to do both tranny fluid and air filter at 30k mile intervals. At 100k, change the spark plugs. If not changed already, do the brake fluid and clutch master/slave fluid. I would not do the serpentine belt but I'd carry another (even used) in the car with all the tools (a long extension or breaker bar) to install it. If you don't already know how to change it, look for the tensioner and figure out how to pull tension off the belt. That's what you do to get it set for a replacement belt.
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graeme
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by graeme »

Basically, do the maintenance specified in the manual at the intervals they recommend. That's worked well for me driving several Hondas past 250,000 miles.

Beyond that, check forum discussions to find common issues and how to avoid or fix them. Knowing about them in advance can save time and money.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by lthenderson »

graeme wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 8:37 am Basically, do the maintenance specified in the manual at the intervals they recommend. That's worked well for me driving several Hondas past 250,000 miles.
This has been my solution as well. I don't replace parts (not covered in the manual maintenance section) until the actually break or become a safety issue.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by daheld »

Do recommended maintenance. It ought to give you way more good miles than 100k.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by researcher »

sunny_socal wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 7:44 am My 2015 accord is about to hit 100k miles.
Are there any 'big ticket' items I should take care of?
What does the owner's manual say?

Is there a reason you don't want follow the manufacturer's maintenance schedule?
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SmallCityDave
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by SmallCityDave »

I don't know your specific car but I would think it's time for new plugs, tranny and cooling system flush, new serpentine belt. The water pump and belt tensioner should be good till 150k miles.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by funktor »

In addition to any manufacturer recommended maintenance, depending on where you live make sure you are keeping the undercarriage clean. I have seen more cars degrade to rust due to salt than mechanical problems in my family as my dad would always hand wash the cars but not clean the bottom free of road salt.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by Ruger »

I had a 1999 Camry that I gave to my nephew when it had 321,000 miles. He drove it another couple of years, and just gave it to a friend of his who is still driving it and putting miles on it. It will not die. I live on a dirt road, so a lot of those miles were on dirt. I wasn't even very good about changing the oil, and I did routine maitenance every 100,000. I don't think it ever needed a major repair. I think the car will outlive me.
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Watty
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by Watty »

Not a big ticket item but be sure to put a little graphite that is made for locks in the locks and turn the key back and forth a few times.

One problem that can come up is if you have door opener and lock button on your key fob you may rarely use the mechanical lock and it can be jammed when you actually need it. I try to use the mechanical key about once a month just to make sure that it does not seize up.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by beyou »

Ruger wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 10:18 am I had a 1999 Camry that I gave to my nephew when it had 321,000 miles. He drove it another couple of years, and just gave it to a friend of his who is still driving it and putting miles on it. It will not die. I live on a dirt road, so a lot of those miles were on dirt. I wasn't even very good about changing the oil, and I did routine maitenance every 100,000. I don't think it ever needed a major repair. I think the car will outlive me.
Yeah, those 90s Toyotas were built to last forever....the good old days.
Nobody makes 'em like that anymore. I think the car makers decided they were doing TOO good of a job.

I had a 90 Camry and 98 Sienna. The 98 Sienna kept for 14 years and only sold it because of cosmetic wear and tear, engine was perfect.
I doubt I'll ever keep another car that long, or at least problem free for so long.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by Chip »

My 2013 Accord is approaching 100k as well. I will do what's recommended in the owner's manual as well as the maintenance minder. I think the MM will recommend a coolant drain/fill and spark plugs in additional to the normal stuff. I will also change the serpentine belt and all coolant hoses. It will also be time for the first brake job (I measured pad thickness recently). I already have all the parts for that. I also change brake fluid on a 3 year interval which I think will coincide with 100k miles.

Other than that, a bunch of inspections. I pay particular attention to the CV joints to make sure they aren't losing grease.

If my car had a manual transmission I would probably replace the fluid at 100k.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by stoptothink »

beyou wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 12:15 pm
Ruger wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 10:18 am I had a 1999 Camry that I gave to my nephew when it had 321,000 miles. He drove it another couple of years, and just gave it to a friend of his who is still driving it and putting miles on it. It will not die. I live on a dirt road, so a lot of those miles were on dirt. I wasn't even very good about changing the oil, and I did routine maitenance every 100,000. I don't think it ever needed a major repair. I think the car will outlive me.
Yeah, those 90s Toyotas were built to last forever....the good old days.
Nobody makes 'em like that anymore. I think the car makers decided they were doing TOO good of a job.
The average age of cars on the road is now nearly 12yrs, a number that has increased significantly in the last two decades. This idea that cars were more reliable in the past doesn't seem to be holding true.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by Mr.BB »

My 2007 Civic EX ... finally traded in two years ago 271,000 miles on it. The only reason I traded it in was because it started having major problems like emissions and radiator.
All I ever did was make sure I always kept up with the oil changes and the basic maintenance stuff. make sure you keep up with changing your transmission, radiator and brake fluid when it is called for.
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ponyboy
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by ponyboy »

100,000?? Its finally broke in. Run it another 100k and report back.

2009 corolla with 178k...hoping to see mid to high 2's
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by foamypirate »

stoptothink wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 12:45 pm
beyou wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 12:15 pm
Ruger wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 10:18 am I had a 1999 Camry that I gave to my nephew when it had 321,000 miles. He drove it another couple of years, and just gave it to a friend of his who is still driving it and putting miles on it. It will not die. I live on a dirt road, so a lot of those miles were on dirt. I wasn't even very good about changing the oil, and I did routine maitenance every 100,000. I don't think it ever needed a major repair. I think the car will outlive me.
Yeah, those 90s Toyotas were built to last forever....the good old days.
Nobody makes 'em like that anymore. I think the car makers decided they were doing TOO good of a job.
The average age of cars on the road is now nearly 12yrs, a number that has increased significantly in the last two decades. This idea that cars were more reliable in the past doesn't seem to be holding true.
Well, in order to bring the average age to 12 years, there needs to be a significant quantity older than that, which puts you into the late 90's and early 00's. Seems to be perfectly in line with what he stated.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by beyou »

foamypirate wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 1:18 pm
stoptothink wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 12:45 pm
beyou wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 12:15 pm
Ruger wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 10:18 am I had a 1999 Camry that I gave to my nephew when it had 321,000 miles. He drove it another couple of years, and just gave it to a friend of his who is still driving it and putting miles on it. It will not die. I live on a dirt road, so a lot of those miles were on dirt. I wasn't even very good about changing the oil, and I did routine maitenance every 100,000. I don't think it ever needed a major repair. I think the car will outlive me.
Yeah, those 90s Toyotas were built to last forever....the good old days.
Nobody makes 'em like that anymore. I think the car makers decided they were doing TOO good of a job.
The average age of cars on the road is now nearly 12yrs, a number that has increased significantly in the last two decades. This idea that cars were more reliable in the past doesn't seem to be holding true.
Well, in order to bring the average age to 12 years, there needs to be a significant quantity older than that, which puts you into the late 90's and early 00's. Seems to be perfectly in line with what he stated.
Yes, and there is also the issue of how WELL those older cars are running. Cars are more and more costly, due to feature creep.
Can't get that Sirius Radio without the overpriced NAV system on my favorite brand of car. Wage stagnation as car prices rise may have
more to do with old cars on the road. There is a noticeable decline in RELIABILITY since cars were made in the 90s, and people spend $ to repair them because it's cheaper than buying a new car. I spent almost NOTHING on repairs for my 2 Toyotas from the 90s. My brother was told by his mechanic at the time to keep his older Toyota rather than buy a new one, as the new ones are not as reliable. Yes maybe some self interest there, but I have heard this anecdotally and my own experience supports what I hear from others. Just look at all the threads here complaining about some models of Honda and Subaru, both of which were rated MOST reliable just a few years ago, ahead of Toyota.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by Brain »

I just sold my '07 Accord with 130,000 miles on it to a friend. I've only done routine maintenance when the minder told me to and I've only had one or two issues that required visiting the shop.

I replaced it with a '19 Accord hybrid. I'm looking forward to another dozen years with it (or maybe giving it to my son when he turns 16 in 7 years).

We also have a '12 Odyssey. No non-routine shop visits so far.

We love our Honda's.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by scubavol »

Lot of good stuff to do covered above. Can I give you one not to do? Oil change at 5k is excessive if you're using recommended oil. Maintenance Minder usually gave me almost 10k between changes in my '12 I-4 (taken out by a hydroplaner last November at 170k, RIP). Even really fanatical, knowledgeable owners seem to largely concur with the MM approach. Having done my own oil changes since 3k was pushing it, it took me a long time to get OK with that. Sound like you're going about 20k a year, so 6 months between changes is not a chronological issue.

Lots of good info available at driveaccord.net.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by stoptothink »

beyou wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 1:28 pm
foamypirate wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 1:18 pm
stoptothink wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 12:45 pm
beyou wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 12:15 pm
Ruger wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 10:18 am I had a 1999 Camry that I gave to my nephew when it had 321,000 miles. He drove it another couple of years, and just gave it to a friend of his who is still driving it and putting miles on it. It will not die. I live on a dirt road, so a lot of those miles were on dirt. I wasn't even very good about changing the oil, and I did routine maitenance every 100,000. I don't think it ever needed a major repair. I think the car will outlive me.
Yeah, those 90s Toyotas were built to last forever....the good old days.
Nobody makes 'em like that anymore. I think the car makers decided they were doing TOO good of a job.
The average age of cars on the road is now nearly 12yrs, a number that has increased significantly in the last two decades. This idea that cars were more reliable in the past doesn't seem to be holding true.
Well, in order to bring the average age to 12 years, there needs to be a significant quantity older than that, which puts you into the late 90's and early 00's. Seems to be perfectly in line with what he stated.
Yes, and there is also the issue of how WELL those older cars are running. Cars are more and more costly, due to feature creep.
Can't get that Sirius Radio without the overpriced NAV system on my favorite brand of car. Wage stagnation as car prices rise may have
more to do with old cars on the road. There is a noticeable decline in RELIABILITY since cars were made in the 90s, and people spend $ to repair them because it's cheaper than buying a new car. I spent almost NOTHING on repairs for my 2 Toyotas from the 90s. My brother was told by his mechanic at the time to keep his older Toyota rather than buy a new one, as the new ones are not as reliable. Yes maybe some self interest there, but I have heard this anecdotally and my own experience supports what I hear from others. Just look at all the threads here complaining about some models of Honda and Subaru, both of which were rated MOST reliable just a few years ago, ahead of Toyota.
I'd be willing to bet that in 10yrs this argument will be moot. Look at the data, the "cars" still on the road that are over 15yrs old are outliers, in fact the HUGE majority of them are trucks (the "average" age of trucks on the road is 18.5yrs). It is not camrys and corollas that are making that number go up, it is F150s and Silverados.

I like my cars simple too, I prefer manual trannies (well, manual everything), but vehicles in general are getting more reliable, not less, despite these anecdotes.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by oldzey »

graeme wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 8:37 am Basically, do the maintenance specified in the manual at the intervals they recommend. That's worked well for me driving several Hondas past 250,000 miles.

Beyond that, check forum discussions to find common issues and how to avoid or fix them. Knowing about them in advance can save time and money.
+1

I'm on my second Honda (2011 Accord).

My first Honda (1988 Civic Hatchback) lasted 22 years. It had almost 240,000 miles on it when I traded it in (got $100 towards my Accord). 8-)
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sunny_socal
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by sunny_socal »

SmallCityDave wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 9:42 am I don't know your specific car but I would think it's time for new plugs, tranny and cooling system flush, new serpentine belt. The water pump and belt tensioner should be good till 150k miles.
Thanks for that. But why not just replace the water pump & tensioner while I'm at it? The largest cost by far is the labor. A belt is probably $20.

As for those wondering "why don't you just follow the manual?" and also those suggesting "I just replace things when they break": I don't want to wait till the minder thinks something is worn our or something breaks. I got 100k miles out of the car by replacing nothing. I'm looking for the typical wear items now and then getting another 100k out of it without waiting for a breakdown. (Oh I know the car won't "die" but if I just let it be I'm sure a belt or pump will break in the next 100k miles)
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by neilpilot »

sunny_socal wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 2:53 pm
SmallCityDave wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 9:42 am I don't know your specific car but I would think it's time for new plugs, tranny and cooling system flush, new serpentine belt. The water pump and belt tensioner should be good till 150k miles.
Thanks for that. But why not just replace the water pump & tensioner while I'm at it? The largest cost by far is the labor. A belt is probably $20.
Good advise when replacing a timing belt, since that involves relatively significant labor. Also, failure of a timing belt on an interference engine is significant, and be caused by a new belt mounted onto an old tensioner.

Not so much when replacing a serpentine belt on a car with a timing chain, since the labor to replace the belt is comparatively trivial.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by gmc4h232 »

sunny_socal wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 2:53 pm
SmallCityDave wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 9:42 am I don't know your specific car but I would think it's time for new plugs, tranny and cooling system flush, new serpentine belt. The water pump and belt tensioner should be good till 150k miles.
Thanks for that. But why not just replace the water pump & tensioner while I'm at it? The largest cost by far is the labor. A belt is probably $20.

As for those wondering "why don't you just follow the manual?" and also those suggesting "I just replace things when they break": I don't want to wait till the minder thinks something is worn our or something breaks. I got 100k miles out of the car by replacing nothing. I'm looking for the typical wear items now and then getting another 100k out of it without waiting for a breakdown. (Oh I know the car won't "die" but if I just let it be I'm sure a belt or pump will break in the next 100k miles)
4cyl has a TIMING chain, no need to replace. 6cyl has a TIMING belt which should be replaced per the manual maintenance interval. Water pump can be replaced at this time if desired. Replacing SERPENTINE belt has no impact on water pump replacement.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by sunny_socal »

gmc4h232 wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 3:31 pm
sunny_socal wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 2:53 pm
SmallCityDave wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 9:42 am I don't know your specific car but I would think it's time for new plugs, tranny and cooling system flush, new serpentine belt. The water pump and belt tensioner should be good till 150k miles.
Thanks for that. But why not just replace the water pump & tensioner while I'm at it? The largest cost by far is the labor. A belt is probably $20.

As for those wondering "why don't you just follow the manual?" and also those suggesting "I just replace things when they break": I don't want to wait till the minder thinks something is worn our or something breaks. I got 100k miles out of the car by replacing nothing. I'm looking for the typical wear items now and then getting another 100k out of it without waiting for a breakdown. (Oh I know the car won't "die" but if I just let it be I'm sure a belt or pump will break in the next 100k miles)
4cyl has a TIMING chain, no need to replace. 6cyl has a TIMING belt which should be replaced per the manual maintenance interval. Water pump can be replaced at this time if desired. Replacing SERPENTINE belt has no impact on water pump replacement.
Not directly, no. But if water pump is a common point of failure and it is usually (always?) replaced at the same time as a timing belt, what would make it suddenly more reliable on vehicles don't have a timing belt? Same MTBF I'll bet.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by beyou »

stoptothink wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 1:54 pm
beyou wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 1:28 pm
foamypirate wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 1:18 pm
stoptothink wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 12:45 pm
beyou wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 12:15 pm

Yeah, those 90s Toyotas were built to last forever....the good old days.
Nobody makes 'em like that anymore. I think the car makers decided they were doing TOO good of a job.
The average age of cars on the road is now nearly 12yrs, a number that has increased significantly in the last two decades. This idea that cars were more reliable in the past doesn't seem to be holding true.
Well, in order to bring the average age to 12 years, there needs to be a significant quantity older than that, which puts you into the late 90's and early 00's. Seems to be perfectly in line with what he stated.
Yes, and there is also the issue of how WELL those older cars are running. Cars are more and more costly, due to feature creep.
Can't get that Sirius Radio without the overpriced NAV system on my favorite brand of car. Wage stagnation as car prices rise may have
more to do with old cars on the road. There is a noticeable decline in RELIABILITY since cars were made in the 90s, and people spend $ to repair them because it's cheaper than buying a new car. I spent almost NOTHING on repairs for my 2 Toyotas from the 90s. My brother was told by his mechanic at the time to keep his older Toyota rather than buy a new one, as the new ones are not as reliable. Yes maybe some self interest there, but I have heard this anecdotally and my own experience supports what I hear from others. Just look at all the threads here complaining about some models of Honda and Subaru, both of which were rated MOST reliable just a few years ago, ahead of Toyota.
I'd be willing to bet that in 10yrs this argument will be moot. Look at the data, the "cars" still on the road that are over 15yrs old are outliers, in fact the HUGE majority of them are trucks (the "average" age of trucks on the road is 18.5yrs). It is not camrys and corollas that are making that number go up, it is F150s and Silverados.

I like my cars simple too, I prefer manual trannies (well, manual everything), but vehicles in general are getting more reliable, not less, despite these anecdotes.
I think simplicity was part of what made cars more reliable in the 90s. I have an automatic rear hatch opener on my 2014 Subaru that has almost never worked. That was a less common feature in the 90s, so can't fail if it isn't there. Subaru can't figure it out, largely because they have overly complex software and chips to operate a dumb as dirt function, a door. I will agree that US made cars have gotten better, not Japanese cars.
US was forced to improve to catch up, and Japanese have added features they cannot or will not troubleshoot when they fail.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by megabad »

With honda or toyota, I don't do any pre-emptive maintenance other than what the manual says. The only other thing I do is brakes when they get thin (which are typically done around 100k on an American car, maybe 125-150k on a japanese car for me).
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by neilpilot »

sunny_socal wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 4:13 pm
Not directly, no. But if water pump is a common point of failure and it is usually (always?) replaced at the same time as a timing belt, what would make it suddenly more reliable on vehicles don't have a timing belt? Same MTBF I'll bet.
Maybe the point of replacing the water pump along with the timing belt hasn't been made clear. It isn't because the water pump is typically expected to fail. It's because the labor to replace the belt is extensive, and IF the pump were to fail after a new belt was installed the same labor would be incurred again.
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by researcher »

sunny_socal wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 2:53 pm Thanks for that. But why not just replace the water pump & tensioner while I'm at it? The largest cost by far is the labor. A belt is probably $20.

As for those wondering "why don't you just follow the manual?" and also those suggesting "I just replace things when they break": I don't want to wait till the minder thinks something is worn our or something breaks. I got 100k miles out of the car by replacing nothing. I'm looking for the typical wear items now and then getting another 100k out of it without waiting for a breakdown. (Oh I know the car won't "die" but if I just let it be I'm sure a belt or pump will break in the next 100k miles)
This is a poor approach to vehicle maintenance, unless you want to waste a lot of money/time/resources.

For reference, I drive a Honda I purchased new, that currently has 172K miles.
Aside from regular maintenance and wear items, guess how many items I have repaired/replaced...ONE (an alternator).

Under your approach you should immediately replace the following, but it would be a huge waste...
- All fluids (oil, transmission, brake, coolant), filters, hoses, and belts
- Pulleys & belt tensioners
- Battery
- Alternator
- Water pump
- Power steering pump
- AC compressor
- Tires
- Brakes
- Springs/struts
- Ball joints
- CV Boots
snowman
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by snowman »

2003 Accord V6 here with 240K miles. I do my own maintenance per manual, no need to complicate it further. 100K miles is barely broken in for an Accord. The only thing outside of standard maintenance items I had to do was replace an alternator at 150K miles, and starter at 180K miles. Just follow the maintenance schedule, there is nothing magical about 100K miles.
zengolf2011
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by zengolf2011 »

My 2014 Honda Crosstour has 60,000 mi. It seems as good as the day I bought it. I do what the Honda dealer suggests, which is usually what the manual/maintenance minder call for. I did go through three Honda dealers for maintenance before landing with one I trust. My current dealer advises me what to change and what is optional, without prompting. For example, I recently replaced tires when the dealer advised me I could go either way, that they would probably be good for another 10k or so. Since I do a lot of driving in desolate, mountainous areas, I opted to go ahead and replace. (My Honda dealer has a price-match guarantee for tires, and price was comparable to Sam's or Costco.) Have driven both Accords and Camrys to 200k in years past (since the early '80s) without issues while simply following the manuals. Based on my experience, I think if you make a good initial brand and model selection based on reliability, following the recommended maintenance schedule will provide a very long, trouble-free service life.
iamlucky13
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by iamlucky13 »

At 100,000 miles, the spark plugs may be nearing their end of life, so I like to replace them at about that time, but it's not really necessary. You'll get a check engine light and with misfire codes if they actually do need replacement, which is not a big deal.

It is commonly recommended to replace, or at least inspect, brake fluid every 3-5 years depending on the manufacturer.

It also would not be a bad idea to inspect the brakes, shocks or struts, belts, CV joint boots, and all fluid levels. You should not need to be pre-emptive on these.

Pretty much everything else described in the manual is programmed to alert you on the dash display maintenance minder when it should be done. Both the engine and cabin air filter should have been one of the codes several times by now.

For the last decade or so, Honda has specified coolant replacement at 120,000 miles or 10 years, and every 60,000 miles or 5 years after that (the normal flush procedure of just the radiator replaces about half of the coolant). Additives in the Honda coolant are intended to help prevent corrosion and help prolong the life of the engine gaskets. This should also come up on the maintenance minder.
Rudedog
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by Rudedog »

1989 Camry--I drive it every day. Car is 30 years old. I perform maintenance as recommended in manual and by dealer. Getting hard to find parts. Paid $ 3,000 for that car in 2002. I'd say I've gotten my money's worth out of it.
brajalle
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by brajalle »

To echo a ton of others above - follow the manual. Be sure you accurately designate your driving as severe or not. Ie, there's typically a suggested maintenance table for severe driving and for regular driving. People may not realize that their 5-10 mile work trip is actually in the severe category or such.

I'd probably agree with the above posters who recommended spark plugs every 100k for the same reasons they mentioned (ie threads for example rather than them being actually worn). Past that, whenever you do get the MTF changed per the schedule, be sure to use Honda genuine MTF. Lastly, check engine oil levels regularly and top up if you ever notice it start to burn oil. Burning oil may not be a problem with a newer Accord, but it definitely was with some models (they experimented with un-sleeved cylinders for example). It's pretty trivial to add oil. I did switch to a high mileage synthetic at some point as well.
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Socrates
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by Socrates »

100,000 is nothing

my 2004 Honda CRV has 220,000 on it no big ticket issues at all....

I change oil regularly on it.....do big maintenance schedule on it so you change transmission fluid, brake fluid, spark plugs, etc

I think I have changed starter and thermostat on it over last 120,000 miles but that is it other than battery and tires
“Don't waste your time looking back. You're not going that way.” ― Ragnar Lothbrok.
swordandscales
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by swordandscales »

Rudedog wrote: Fri Jul 26, 2019 11:19 am 1989 Camry--I drive it every day. Car is 30 years old. I perform maintenance as recommended in manual and by dealer. Getting hard to find parts. Paid $ 3,000 for that car in 2002. I'd say I've gotten my money's worth out of it.
This is epic. How many miles/km?
Discipline is freedom. | -Jocko Willink
MathIsMyWayr
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

sunny_socal wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 4:13 pm
gmc4h232 wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 3:31 pm
sunny_socal wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 2:53 pm
Thanks for that. But why not just replace the water pump & tensioner while I'm at it? The largest cost by far is the labor. A belt is probably $20.
4cyl has a TIMING chain, no need to replace. 6cyl has a TIMING belt which should be replaced per the manual maintenance interval. Water pump can be replaced at this time if desired. Replacing SERPENTINE belt has no impact on water pump replacement.
Not directly, no. But if water pump is a common point of failure and it is usually (always?) replaced at the same time as a timing belt, what would make it suddenly more reliable on vehicles don't have a timing belt? Same MTBF I'll bet.
Since a timing chain is made of steel just like a bike chain, it usually lasts the lifetime of a car. A timing belt is made of rubber, has a much shorter life time and needs a periodic replacement. Despite the hassle of replacement, time belts are naturally quite.
audioaxes
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by audioaxes »

I dont even do the recommended maintenance on my 2012 camry besides oil changes and its closing in on 200k miles without any issues
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sunny_socal
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by sunny_socal »

audioaxes wrote: Mon Jul 29, 2019 5:44 pm I dont even do the recommended maintenance on my 2012 camry besides oil changes and its closing in on 200k miles without any issues
Maybe I should just use your approach (seriously.) I drive about 25k/year and will hit 200k when most people are reaching 100k.

Thanks all! :beer
scophreak
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by scophreak »

beyou wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 1:28 pm Yes, and there is also the issue of how WELL those older cars are running. Cars are more and more costly, due to feature creep.
Can't get that Sirius Radio without the overpriced NAV system on my favorite brand of car. Wage stagnation as car prices rise may have
more to do with old cars on the road. There is a noticeable decline in RELIABILITY since cars were made in the 90s, and people spend $ to repair them because it's cheaper than buying a new car. I spent almost NOTHING on repairs for my 2 Toyotas from the 90s. My brother was told by his mechanic at the time to keep his older Toyota rather than buy a new one, as the new ones are not as reliable. Yes maybe some self interest there, but I have heard this anecdotally and my own experience supports what I hear from others. Just look at all the threads here complaining about some models of Honda and Subaru, both of which were rated MOST reliable just a few years ago, ahead of Toyota.
Not to pick on you specifically, but I commented on one of your similar posts in another thread. Specifically, you mention that SiriusXM is not available on your favorite brand (Subaru, based on the previous thread) without the NAV system. As I mentioned previously, this certainly isn't true, at least for many Subaru models. I own a 2019 Ascent WITHOUT NAV and absolutely have SiriusXM (I use CarPlay coupled with phone-based NAV). Also briefly looked at Outback and Forester (all trims have standard SiriusXM) as well as Crosstrek (all trims other than the base model come standard with SiriusXM; NAV package is optional). I didn't look at all Subaru models, but the majority of Subaru cars sold come standard with SiriusXM. Either you've got some inaccurate info or one of the other Subaru models that I didn't check doesn't fit the mold.
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beyou
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by beyou »

scophreak wrote: Tue Jul 30, 2019 8:33 am
beyou wrote: Wed Jul 24, 2019 1:28 pm Yes, and there is also the issue of how WELL those older cars are running. Cars are more and more costly, due to feature creep.
Can't get that Sirius Radio without the overpriced NAV system on my favorite brand of car. Wage stagnation as car prices rise may have
more to do with old cars on the road. There is a noticeable decline in RELIABILITY since cars were made in the 90s, and people spend $ to repair them because it's cheaper than buying a new car. I spent almost NOTHING on repairs for my 2 Toyotas from the 90s. My brother was told by his mechanic at the time to keep his older Toyota rather than buy a new one, as the new ones are not as reliable. Yes maybe some self interest there, but I have heard this anecdotally and my own experience supports what I hear from others. Just look at all the threads here complaining about some models of Honda and Subaru, both of which were rated MOST reliable just a few years ago, ahead of Toyota.
Not to pick on you specifically, but I commented on one of your similar posts in another thread. Specifically, you mention that SiriusXM is not available on your favorite brand (Subaru, based on the previous thread) without the NAV system. As I mentioned previously, this certainly isn't true, at least for many Subaru models. I own a 2019 Ascent WITHOUT NAV and absolutely have SiriusXM (I use CarPlay coupled with phone-based NAV). Also briefly looked at Outback and Forester (all trims have standard SiriusXM) as well as Crosstrek (all trims other than the base model come standard with SiriusXM; NAV package is optional). I didn't look at all Subaru models, but the majority of Subaru cars sold come standard with SiriusXM. Either you've got some inaccurate info or one of the other Subaru models that I didn't check doesn't fit the mold.
They change these options each year.
My 2012 Outback has SIRIUS XM without NAV, but my 2014 Forester absolutely did not offer them unbundled. I would have gotten Sirius otherwise.
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sunny_socal
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Re: Accord approaching 100k miles, how to push it beyond

Post by sunny_socal »

No sooner had a posted this thread that something very central broke: the accessory belt tensioner. The failure manifests itself as a high-pitched whine that varies with the engine RPM, sound just like a broken power steering pump except this vehicle doesn't have one.

Bought the parts and fixed it myself, cost a little over $200 for the pulley and belt. Quote from dealer was $600.

Youtube video for how to do it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3td6K3EyDDQ
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