Tesla’s regenerative braking

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katnok
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Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by katnok »

We’ve been thinking of buying an EV, specifically a Tesla. So, yesterday I test drove model Y. I liked the car overall but one thing that really annoyed me was regenerative braking, which the sales guy said was standard on all the latest models and can’t be turned off.

I’m wondering if I will ever be able to get used to it.
How long did it take for those of you who found themselves in this situation?

Thank you.
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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by TomatoTomahto »

katnok wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 8:29 am We’ve been thinking of buying an EV, specifically a Tesla. So, yesterday I test drove model Y. I liked the car overall but one thing that really annoyed me was regenerative braking, which the sales guy said was standard on all the latest models and can’t be turned off.

I’m wondering if I will ever be able to get used to it.
How long did it take for those of you who found themselves in this situation?

Thank you.
It took me two days to get used to it. Now it bugs me when it is diminished (it is diminished when the car is cold and/or charged full). I got accustomed to one pedal driving literally overnight.
I get the FI part but not the RE part of FIRE.
A2_MI
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by A2_MI »

TomatoTomahto wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 8:37 am It took me two days to get used to it. Now it bugs me when it is diminished (it is diminished when the car is cold and/or charged full). I got accustomed to one pedal driving literally overnight.
Same here - took me about 1-2 days and then it was second nature. Now when I drive my wife’s car, I’m like “What? I have to use the brake pedal? Ugh!” :happy
dukeblue219
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by dukeblue219 »

I've gone back and forth and it's no issue. Don't let it be a significant factor in your decision making, and remember that the days of routine brake service will be over.
Normchad
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by Normchad »

A2_MI wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 8:50 am
TomatoTomahto wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 8:37 am It took me two days to get used to it. Now it bugs me when it is diminished (it is diminished when the car is cold and/or charged full). I got accustomed to one pedal driving literally overnight.
Same here - took me about 1-2 days and then it was second nature. Now when I drive my wife’s car, I’m like “What? I have to use the brake pedal? Ugh!” :happy
This. Took a day, and now I absolutely love it. One pedal driving is so nice.....

Also, I really doubt that you can’t turn it down. You certainly can in my car, but I wouldn’t want to.....

I read somewhere that roughly 30% of the electricity that goes into the battery, comes from the regenerative braking.

And oh man, is “auto hold” awesome. Once the car comes to a stop, it will just stay there until you use the accelerator. No need to use the break pedal, or worry about creeping forward,etc. There are about 100 little things that shouldn’t matter much, but taken together, just make the overall experience so great. (It remembers where the car wash is, and automatically folds and unfolds the mirrors when I, etc etc)
Last edited by Normchad on Sun May 09, 2021 9:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by TomatoTomahto »

A2_MI wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 8:50 am
TomatoTomahto wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 8:37 am It took me two days to get used to it. Now it bugs me when it is diminished (it is diminished when the car is cold and/or charged full). I got accustomed to one pedal driving literally overnight.
Same here - took me about 1-2 days and then it was second nature. Now when I drive my wife’s car, I’m like “What? I have to use the brake pedal? Ugh!” :happy
I play a game where the goal is to not touch the brakes at > 5 mph for as long as I can. It rewards predicting traffic flow and attentiveness. I can often go an hour without touching the brake.

OP, I also test drove a Model Y last week. It’s light years more advanced than my 2016 Model X. I honestly don’t think regenerative braking will be bothersome to you in a short while.
I get the FI part but not the RE part of FIRE.
Paradise
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by Paradise »

IIRC there is a setting to reduce it, but as others have posted you’ll be addicted to it after a bit of time so it’s probably moot. The first time I drove a Tesla, I won’t lie I was a bit scared.

Teslas are amazing cars. I have an X myself.

Just be prepared for random build quality issues that you’re probably not used to in other cars. The entire car is a big computer so it has more little problems but less severe problems if that makes sense. Don’t fall for the talk about it having no maintenance. Instead of replacing spark plugs you’ll be replacing door sensors or build quality issues like screws/bolts that just doesn’t happen in other cars. In two years I’ve taken it in for loud grinding noises while driving/turning 4 times — something you wouldn’t expect from a $100,000 car. You at least won’t have to worry about a transmission failure, though. It’s still a car company in its infancy stage. Nowhere near the reliability and experience of Toyota, for example.

It sounds like you’re buying new so you won’t have to pay for 4 years but just know it will be in the shop at least a couple times a year whereas you’d expect 0 problems from other cars in their first 4 years.
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Normchad
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by Normchad »

Paradise wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 9:04 am IIRC there is a setting to reduce it, but as others have posted you’ll be addicted to it after a bit of time so it’s probably moot.

Teslas are amazing cars. I have an X myself.

Just be prepared for random build quality issues that you’re probably not used to in other cars. The entire car is a big computer so it has more little problems but less severe problems if that makes sense. Don’t fall for the talk about it having no maintenance. Instead of replacing spark plugs you’ll be replacing door sensors or build quality issues like screws/bolts that just doesn’t happen in other cars. In two years I’ve taken it in for loud grinding noises while driving/turning 4 times — something you wouldn’t expect from a $100,000 car. You at least won’t have to worry about a transmission failure, though. It’s still a car company in its infancy stage. Nowhere near the reliability and experience of Toyota, for example.
I hear this, and I don’t dispute it, but I wonder about it.

We know there have been a lot of “initial build quality” issues in the past. Trim pieces misaligned, defects in the paint, etc. although my car, and the cars of my two close friends, had zero of these types of issues.

As far as reliability goes, I haven’t had any issues. And owners I talk to don’t seem to have any reliability issues either. It’s possible those will crop up with the passage of time, but I don’t get the narrative that they ‘aren’t reliable”. I’m guessing when people say that, they’re really talking about the initial build quality problems. I Think Tomato has talked before about some issues he’s had with the doors on his Model X, but I might be misremembering there. And Paradise certainly has an issue.

But these don’t seem any worse or more frequent than what I hear from BMW or Mercedes owners.....

I finally made the decision to buy after looking at the long term reliability data from the California Taxi company that shuttles people back and forth to Vegas.
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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by TomatoTomahto »

If I had to guess, I would wager that a new Model Y will have far fewer issues than my Model X. Tesla learned a lot over the years, and I think even Elon admitted that his ambitions for the X got ahead of him. The Y I test drove last week was very impressive.

The X is overly complicated. I still love it, and considering I received VIN 0002xx (Tesla service always thanks me for being a supporter of the mission), I appreciate that it has held up well. The door latches were all replaced (free of charge).
I get the FI part but not the RE part of FIRE.
MathWizard
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by MathWizard »

I don't mind regenerative braking on my hybrid, but it only happens when I press lightly on the brake, as far as I can tell.

Does a pure electric start braking, hopefully mildly, as soon as you let up on the accelerator?

If so, then I guess you will need to keep your foot on the accelerator unless you are retrying to stop. That would just take me a few days to get used to.

I've gotten used to the my car's gas engine turning off at a long stoplight, which was more disconcerting, since my first car would sometimes stop at a long light, even though it was not supposed to :oops:
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Blueskies123
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by Blueskies123 »

It literally took me 100 feet to get used to regenerative brakes. My wife who struggles with her iPhone took a few days. I love the brakes and try to never touch the brakes. One of the main selling points of EVs is to recapture all that wasted energy when you use the brakes.
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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by TomatoTomahto »

MathWizard wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 9:27 am Does a pure electric start braking, hopefully mildly, as soon as you let up on the accelerator?
Yes, and it will light up the “brake lights.” It’s a pretty natural amount of braking, ie, if you lighten up on the pedal it will brake mildly, and then graduate from there.
I get the FI part but not the RE part of FIRE.
Paradise
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by Paradise »

Owned and driven BMWs for a while. If you get the service, oil changes, and replacables (spark plugs, filters, etc) on time and don’t mistreat the car, you’re good to go for 90-100k miles. After 100k is when your transmission is on its last leg. The people with horror stories are the people who don’t take care of the car.

I have never in driving a BMW heard noises while turning the steering wheel. There’s also a lot less than can go wrong with it as it’s not fully computerized, doesn’t have autopilot so it’s not exactly apples to apples comparison. Most of the Tesla problems are due to features extra to a regular car. It still doesn’t mean that you don’t have to pay to fix it, though.

There’s a reason Tesla discontinued the CPO and extended 4 year warranty. They were losing so much money fixing older cars, so it can’t be just an “initial build quality” thing.
Last edited by Paradise on Sun May 09, 2021 9:48 am, edited 2 times in total.
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02nz
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by 02nz »

katnok wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 8:29 am We’ve been thinking of buying an EV, specifically a Tesla. So, yesterday I test drove model Y. I liked the car overall but one thing that really annoyed me was regenerative braking, which the sales guy said was standard on all the latest models and can’t be turned off.

I’m wondering if I will ever be able to get used to it.
How long did it take for those of you who found themselves in this situation?

Thank you.
Almost all EVs, including Teslas, let you choose among multiple levels of regen braking. I believe Teslas have just two settings, but many others have more levels for you to choose from. In many cases, including on Teslas, the most aggressive setting is "one-pedal driving" - lift off the throttle all the way and the car will come to a complete stop, you only need to hit the brake pedal for emergency stops. This is especially good for stop-and-go traffic and city driving, as you can modulate the speed without having to touch the brake pedal. I found that I got used to it very quickly and even prefer it now to conventional cars' setup.

If you're looking at a Model Y, I'd also check out the Ford "Mustang" Mach-E, VW ID.4, and - coming this fall - the Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Audi Q4 E-Tron. The Ioniq in particular looks to be worth the wait.
Angst
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by Angst »

02nz wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 9:46 am
katnok wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 8:29 am We’ve been thinking of buying an EV, specifically a Tesla. So, yesterday I test drove model Y. I liked the car overall but one thing that really annoyed me was regenerative braking, which the sales guy said was standard on all the latest models and can’t be turned off.

I’m wondering if I will ever be able to get used to it.
How long did it take for those of you who found themselves in this situation?
Almost all EVs, including Teslas, let you choose among multiple levels of regen braking. I believe Teslas have just two settings, but many others have more levels for you to choose from. In many cases, including on Teslas, the most aggressive setting is "one-pedal driving" - lift off the throttle all the way and the car will come to a complete stop, you only need to hit the brake pedal for emergency stops. This is especially good for stop-and-go traffic and city driving, as you can modulate the speed without having to touch the brake pedal. I found that I got used to it very quickly and even prefer it now to conventional cars' setup.

If you're looking at a Model Y, I'd also check out the Ford "Mustang" Mach-E, VW ID.4, and - coming this fall - the Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Audi Q4 E-Tron. The Ioniq in particular looks to be worth the wait.
Wow... I would (will eventually, I suppose) have a lot of trouble with all of this, at least the way I hear it described in this thread. I have always owned manual transmission cars because I really enjoy driving them, and so that left foot of mine stays quite busy, thank you, and I routinely find myself taking the car out of gear briefly when it's more efficient to let the car coast for a short bit and then often reengaging the engine for "breaking". Is a Tesla with full regenerative breaking incapable of freely coasting? Perhaps it's time for a test drive. :D
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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by TomatoTomahto »

Angst wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 10:13 am Is a Tesla with full regenerative breaking incapable of freely coasting? Perhaps it's time for a test drive.
No, it is capable of it if you apply the right amount of “go pedal.” In fact, there is a dashboard indication of electrons to the motor, battery, or neither if you’re a visual learner (I’m an aural learner, so I listen instead).

Yes, schedule a test drive.
I get the FI part but not the RE part of FIRE.
hunoraut
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by hunoraut »

Drove manual transmission for decades, and rode fixed-gear bicycle (i.e. non-coasting). Took me all of 3 seconds to get used to it.

Gave test drives to others and none of them had any difficulties adjusting at all. It's like switching from car to car e.g. using a rental, with different tuned acceleration and brakes... you instinctually adapt to the pedal sensitivity.
JackoC
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by JackoC »

Normchad wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 9:14 am
Paradise wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 9:04 am Just be prepared for random build quality issues that you’re probably not used to in other cars. The entire car is a big computer so it has more little problems but less severe problems if that makes sense. Don’t fall for the talk about it having no maintenance. Instead of replacing spark plugs you’ll be replacing door sensors or build quality issues like screws/bolts that just doesn’t happen in other cars. In two years I’ve taken it in for loud grinding noises while driving/turning 4 times — something you wouldn’t expect from a $100,000 car. You at least won’t have to worry about a transmission failure, though. It’s still a car company in its infancy stage. Nowhere near the reliability and experience of Toyota, for example.
I hear this, and I don’t dispute it, but I wonder about it.

But these don’t seem any worse or more frequent than what I hear from BMW or Mercedes owners.....
In Consumer Reports brank ranking for reliability last November Tesla was 25th out of 26th. Tesla fans here do not like to hear that, and that's not really a new phenomenon. Fans of the nominally US brand ICE cars for years rejected CR results but I would say most people at this point admit that Japanese (and more recently Korean) brands have an advantage among the ICE brands in this respect and also admit it was big difference back when CR was saying it was a big difference (not *as* big now). When/if Tesla closes the gap on this, more Tesla fans will probably admit this was still a real thing as of 2021.
https://www.autonews.com/manufacturing/ ... s-15-spots

On the plus side, cars with relatively low build quality/reliability now like Tesla would compare much more favorably with relatively high build quality/reliable cars of decades ago. Things have gotten generally better. Any given car of a relatively poor build quality/low reliability brand or model now is not that likely to have a significant problem. And though BMW ranks distinctly higher than Tesla in that ranking (12th), BMW isn't Lexus (2nd behind Mazda, first year in many it wasn't 1st) either in that respect. I have a particular BMW model, because I really like the particular car. I don't feel I have to invent arguments why Lexus' impressive track record as a brand in build quality/reliability is somehow irrelevant.
alexander29
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by alexander29 »

I’m a Model Y owner who has had the car for nearly a year. You get used to regenerative braking in anywhere from an hour to a couple of days, and once you do a conventional car seems antiquated. I haven’t had any problems with the Y either on initial quality or since. Awesome car. Oh, and I can turn regenerative braking off, but never would.
mpnret
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by mpnret »

Model 3 owner here. Regenerative braking is a great feature of the car and takes very little getting used to. Settings allow you to customize it but I see no need to. Often when my wife returns from using the car she will proudly state she did the whole trip without touching the brake pedal once.
Big Dog
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by Big Dog »

Regen is FANTASTIC. Took a couple of days to get used to it. Now rarely use brakes as I can use regen to slow and stop at stoplights. Truly one-pedal driving.
squirm
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by squirm »

Regen braking is the best with one pedal driving! Give a couple of days and you'll really like it.
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Allocationist
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by Allocationist »

As a long-time and very satisfied Tesla owner, it will be a bit of an adjustment for you to probably never have to get a brake reline during the life of the car. IMO a nice kind of "problem."
02nz
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by 02nz »

alexander29 wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 1:32 pm I’m a Model Y owner who has had the car for nearly a year. You get used to regenerative braking in anywhere from an hour to a couple of days, and once you do a conventional car seems antiquated. I haven’t had any problems with the Y either on initial quality or since. Awesome car. Oh, and I can turn regenerative braking off, but never would.
AFAIK you cannot turn it off altogether, and apparently Tesla produced since June 2020 don't even allow you to choose the less aggressive setting: https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/tesl ... s-new-evs/
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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by TomatoTomahto »

Allocationist wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 3:25 pm As a long-time and very satisfied Tesla owner, it will be a bit of an adjustment for you to probably never have to get a brake reline during the life of the car. IMO a nice kind of "problem."
I think I once figured out that, based on the wear and mileage, I was likely to go more than 250k miles before needing to replace my brake pads. Which, given my age and driving history, would probably be some decades after my death :beer
I get the FI part but not the RE part of FIRE.
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by Big Dog »

TomatoTomahto wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 3:29 pm
Allocationist wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 3:25 pm As a long-time and very satisfied Tesla owner, it will be a bit of an adjustment for you to probably never have to get a brake reline during the life of the car. IMO a nice kind of "problem."
I think I once figured out that, based on the wear and mileage, I was likely to go more than 250k miles before needing to replace my brake pads. Which, given my age and driving history, would probably be some decades after my death :beer
I'm more worried about the rotors rusting out from non-use. :mrgreen:
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by oragne lovre »

katnok wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 8:29 am We’ve been thinking of buying an EV, specifically a Tesla. So, yesterday I test drove model Y. I liked the car overall but one thing that really annoyed me was regenerative braking, which the sales guy said was standard on all the latest models and can’t be turned off.

I’m wondering if I will ever be able to get used to it.
How long did it take for those of you who found themselves in this situation?

Thank you.
It took me couple of days to get used to it. Now I'm addicted to it because it takes away all the fatigue of right foot the lower back discomfort when I take long-distance trips. I also gives me a piece of mind because my mind doesn't have to be in a constant state of alertness just for promptly pressing on a brake pedal at those full stops. I have become a happier driver :D
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Normchad
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by Normchad »

Big Dog wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 5:16 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 3:29 pm
Allocationist wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 3:25 pm As a long-time and very satisfied Tesla owner, it will be a bit of an adjustment for you to probably never have to get a brake reline during the life of the car. IMO a nice kind of "problem."
I think I once figured out that, based on the wear and mileage, I was likely to go more than 250k miles before needing to replace my brake pads. Which, given my age and driving history, would probably be some decades after my death :beer
I'm more worried about the rotors rusting out from non-use. :mrgreen:
Tesla recommends annual brake service for cold weather climates. The non- use of the friction brakes can lead to rust on the caliper slide pins. So they recommend a cleaning and lubrication in cold weather climates.

I just make sure to use the brakes every few weeks.....

https://www.tesla.com/support/car-maintenance
hunoraut
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by hunoraut »

Regenerative braking doesn’t mean no friction braking, it just means less friction braking. There will still be many scenarios requiring the strong use of friction brakes.
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by angelescrest »

TomatoTomahto wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 9:03 am OP, I also test drove a Model Y last week. It’s light years more advanced than my 2016 Model X.
How so?
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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by TomatoTomahto »

angelescrest wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 7:16 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 9:03 am OP, I also test drove a Model Y last week. It’s light years more advanced than my 2016 Model X.
How so?
The seats felt better, it was quieter, and the sensors had a much more comprehensive idea of what was happening on the road.
I get the FI part but not the RE part of FIRE.
BedHead2020
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by BedHead2020 »

Many people are weirded out by regenerative braking at first. It took me just a few days to become accustomed to it. “One pedal driving” is awesome. Driving cars that require me to press the brake to keep the car from rolling away at a stop lights seems strange now.
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by Normchad »

BedHead2020 wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 8:56 pm Many people are weirded out by regenerative braking at first. It took me just a few days to become accustomed to it. “One pedal driving” is awesome. Driving cars that require me to press the brake to keep the car from rolling away at a stop lights seems strange now.
My wife drives a 2017 Acura RDX. I used to love that thing. It was great for road trips. Now that I’ve been driving the Tesla for 2 years, it honestly feels like driving chitty-chitty-bang-bang.

I try to avoid driving it now..... and it’s objectively a really nice vehicle.
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by FoolStreet »

It’s really a nice feature once you drive with it a couple times. It really helps with one pedal driving. Funny enough, driving other low-rolling friction cars freaks me out now since I have to really sit on the brakes. I feel like I have so much more control with one pedal driving.

Philosophically, it changes the paradigm of driving with an Gas car. Now, you want to recapture as much energy from braking as possible to make the car as efficient as possible. Gas cars don’t have batteries to store energy from braking and so they are very inefficient. Instead, they try to have as much low friction rolling, so the driver feathers the brakes for max distance.

The efficiency paradigm is changing. It’s pretty cool and helps a ton in snowy conditions, for example, compared to other cars with great AWD systems.
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by Fat Tails »

squirm wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 3:18 pm Regen braking is the best with one pedal driving! Give a couple of days and you'll really like it.
+1, it is one of the great features of electric vehicles. Even if you could disable it, it would significantly reduce your range.

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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by casun »

regenerative braking/one pedal driving is one of my favorite things about my tesla.
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by harikaried »

Not sure if anybody else tried to get smooth stops before a Tesla, but in previous ICE vehicles, I would ease off the brake pedal a little just as it was coming to a complete stop to avoid the slight bounce back. Now with Tesla handling the braking when you stop pressing the accelerator, it's a completely smooth stop pretty much every time.
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katnok
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by katnok »

OP here.
Sorry for the late reply, but I greatly appreciate all the replies.
Some of you mentioned that regenerative braking can be turned off, but it seems like you can't do that on 2021 models.
Those of you that own model Y, can you please comment on the ride comfort? We test drove the Y on city roads as well as on freeway. My wife felt the ride was quite rough on the city roads. For comparison, we have a 2018 Accord Touring (not sport), which in my wife's opinion, has poor ride comfort. She thought Y was worse.
I wondered if the test drive was not long enough to make that judgement. Has you experience been different?
Thank you.
Big Dog
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by Big Dog »

Don't have a Y, but Tesla's have sporty-suspensions by design, so yeah, they ride (a lot) firmer than a car with a suspension tuned for touring. You can lessen the roughness by running the tires at a lower pressure point, but still in the safe range, but that will make a small hit to range.
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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by TomatoTomahto »

Big Dog wrote: Mon May 17, 2021 6:17 pm Don't have a Y, but Tesla's have sporty-suspensions by design, so yeah, they ride (a lot) firmer than a car with a suspension tuned for touring. You can lessen the roughness by running the tires at a lower pressure point, but still in the safe range, but that will make a small hit to range.
You can also drive on higher profile tires. My Model X is rough on 20” tires but much “softer” on 19”.
I get the FI part but not the RE part of FIRE.
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katnok
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by katnok »

TomatoTomahto wrote: Mon May 17, 2021 6:21 pm
Big Dog wrote: Mon May 17, 2021 6:17 pm Don't have a Y, but Tesla's have sporty-suspensions by design, so yeah, they ride (a lot) firmer than a car with a suspension tuned for touring. You can lessen the roughness by running the tires at a lower pressure point, but still in the safe range, but that will make a small hit to range.
You can also drive on higher profile tires. My Model X is rough on 20” tires but much “softer” on 19”.
That's a good point. Thank you.
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eye.surgeon
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by eye.surgeon »

katnok wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 8:29 am We’ve been thinking of buying an EV, specifically a Tesla. So, yesterday I test drove model Y. I liked the car overall but one thing that really annoyed me was regenerative braking, which the sales guy said was standard on all the latest models and can’t be turned off.

I’m wondering if I will ever be able to get used to it.
How long did it take for those of you who found themselves in this situation?

Thank you.
I immediately loved regenerative braking and it's one of the things I miss about driving an EV (drove a Tesla for 6 yrs but driving a Audi S6 now).
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FoolStreet
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by FoolStreet »

katnok wrote: Mon May 17, 2021 9:20 pm
TomatoTomahto wrote: Mon May 17, 2021 6:21 pm
Big Dog wrote: Mon May 17, 2021 6:17 pm Don't have a Y, but Tesla's have sporty-suspensions by design, so yeah, they ride (a lot) firmer than a car with a suspension tuned for touring. You can lessen the roughness by running the tires at a lower pressure point, but still in the safe range, but that will make a small hit to range.
You can also drive on higher profile tires. My Model X is rough on 20” tires but much “softer” on 19”.
That's a good point. Thank you.
Did you test drive a performance model?
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by angelescrest »

katnok wrote: Mon May 17, 2021 5:59 pm OP here.
Sorry for the late reply, but I greatly appreciate all the replies.
Some of you mentioned that regenerative braking can be turned off, but it seems like you can't do that on 2021 models.
Those of you that own model Y, can you please comment on the ride comfort? We test drove the Y on city roads as well as on freeway. My wife felt the ride was quite rough on the city roads. For comparison, we have a 2018 Accord Touring (not sport), which in my wife's opinion, has poor ride comfort. She thought Y was worse.
I wondered if the test drive was not long enough to make that judgement. Has you experience been different?
Thank you.
This is one of the reasons I’m not as keen on getting a Tesla, as much as I admire the brand. The ID.4 has a softer ride that I bet your wife would like. Additionally, its regenerative braking is intentionally light for people such as yourself. EV enthusiasts complain, while drivers coming from ICE cars seem to really like it. Fwiw, I’ve also never driven a Honda where I didn’t feel every bump. Even top of the line Odysseys feel jarring on not so smooth roads.
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by alfaspider »

katnok wrote: Mon May 17, 2021 5:59 pm OP here.
Sorry for the late reply, but I greatly appreciate all the replies.
Some of you mentioned that regenerative braking can be turned off, but it seems like you can't do that on 2021 models.
Those of you that own model Y, can you please comment on the ride comfort? We test drove the Y on city roads as well as on freeway. My wife felt the ride was quite rough on the city roads. For comparison, we have a 2018 Accord Touring (not sport), which in my wife's opinion, has poor ride comfort. She thought Y was worse.
I wondered if the test drive was not long enough to make that judgement. Has you experience been different?
Thank you.
Ha! The Model 3 I test drove drove felt like a plush Rolls Royce compared to my Subaru STI. As others have mentioned, ride comfort will be best on the smallest wheel and highest profile tire. I think it's something you'd get used to.

I agree with others that Teslas make even relatively late model ICE cars feel very antiquated. In many ways, my 2016 Subaru feels closer to my 1986 Alfa Romeo than the Tesla.
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by Paradise »

One added benefit of the brakes that I forgot to mention is if you pair it with the early collision detection warning. When milliseconds count between a collision or not, the added deceleration while changing your foot to the brake could save you.
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TravelGeek
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by TravelGeek »

katnok wrote: Mon May 17, 2021 5:59 pm Some of you mentioned that regenerative braking can be turned off, but it seems like you can't do that on 2021 models.
That appears to be correct. My fairly recent Model Y doesn't have the setup option, and it appears it was removed in mid-2020 for new cars.

https://electrek.co/2020/10/27/tesla-re ... -new-cars/

Not a big deal for me; my previous EV had what I called golf-cart mode (e-Pedal drive) with regenerative braking and I found it very convenient. Learning curve was minimal. And I am very happy with the Tesla implementation.
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by auntie »

I've never driven a car with regenerative braking. I'm just wondering how it reacts if you suddenly take your foot off the pedal. Does it come to a slow stop?
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by TomatoTomahto »

auntie wrote: Tue May 18, 2021 1:54 pm I've never driven a car with regenerative braking. I'm just wondering how it reacts if you suddenly take your foot off the pedal. Does it come to a slow stop?
It stops quicker than an automatic ICE vehicle would (ie, it’s not just coasting), but it won’t fling you at the windshield. A manual ICE would stall eventually.

Another difference is that your brake lights would indicate with the EV, but not with the ICE vehicles.
I get the FI part but not the RE part of FIRE.
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Re: Tesla’s regenerative braking

Post by hnd »

Paradise wrote: Sun May 09, 2021 9:04 am IIRC there is a setting to reduce it, but as others have posted you’ll be addicted to it after a bit of time so it’s probably moot. The first time I drove a Tesla, I won’t lie I was a bit scared.

Teslas are amazing cars. I have an X myself.

Just be prepared for random build quality issues that you’re probably not used to in other cars. The entire car is a big computer so it has more little problems but less severe problems if that makes sense. Don’t fall for the talk about it having no maintenance. Instead of replacing spark plugs you’ll be replacing door sensors or build quality issues like screws/bolts that just doesn’t happen in other cars. In two years I’ve taken it in for loud grinding noises while driving/turning 4 times — something you wouldn’t expect from a $100,000 car. You at least won’t have to worry about a transmission failure, though. It’s still a car company in its infancy stage. Nowhere near the reliability and experience of Toyota, for example.

It sounds like you’re buying new so you won’t have to pay for 4 years but just know it will be in the shop at least a couple times a year whereas you’d expect 0 problems from other cars in their first 4 years.
my boss' X will randomly open all its doors and sometimes will randomly reboot right before getting ready to drive. its pretty hilarious. he still basically loves the vehicle and has been a car guy his entire life. but he's always cursing about it for this or that.
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